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How to stop beating yourself up

Screen Shot 2013-12-10 at Dec 10, 11.37.36 AMThere is still time to join us for a retreat this weekend in Florida, just south of Tampa, Feb 21–23. It’s on the theme of self-compassion and it’s called “How to Stop Beating Yourself Up.”

Self-compassion is at the heart of my teaching these days.

The retreat fees include food and accommodation, and they’re on a sliding scale.

Most us us have the habit of being unkind to ourselves. We talk unkindly to ourselves and often we sacrifice our own well-being in order to “get things done.”

Florida Retreat Center
Florida Retreat Center
Florida Retreat Center
Florida Retreat Center

On this weekend retreat, Bodhipaksa will introduce a step-by-step guide to self-compassion, so that we can learn to be less hard on ourselves.

To allow people of varying income levels to attend, we have three suggested contributions: $250 for those with lower disposable incomes, $350 as the “standard” contribution, and $450 for those with more disposable income available. The price of the retreat includes food, which will be vegetarian/vegan.

The retreat will start at 7:00 PM on Friday and end at 12:30 PM on Sunday.

There are a couple of spaces still available.

You can read more, or sign up, here: http://www.wildmind.org/florida

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About Mark Tillotson

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I am the Business Manager at Wildmind.org. I've been through a 12-step recovery program and my life has changed dramatically thanks to all the help I've received. So I find that I love nothing better than helping people in return. A few months ago I discovered meditation, and it's become a crucial part of my life. Now I want to share that too! When I saw that Wildmind was in need of help, I immediately reached out and made myself available to help them in their mission to change the world by spreading mindfulness and compassion. Read more articles by .

Comments

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Comment from Oliver
Time: February 20, 2014, 11:09 am

Self-compassion is very important, and lots of people in the Western world (although I’ve heard it doesn’t occur much in traditionally Buddhist countries) have a great deal of self-hatred. The only thing I’ve noticed though is that some teachers of self-compassion remove the need for improving ourselves and extending compassion to others. That’s something I think we have to be careful of.

One teacher of self-compassion I’ve heard said “we accept we are not perfect, because wouldn’t life be really boring if we were all perfect?”. This is a problematic belief, because being not perfect includes becoming drunk, angry and violent. We certainly don’t want to accept a violent temper because it makes life more exciting!

Sangharakshita gave a talk with the title “Don’t Accept Yourself”. While self-hatred is one extreme that too many people fall into, he points out that self-indulgence and accepting the unskillful is too common these days. Sometimes we have to judge ourselves and others so we can get better.

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