Tibetan exile mani stones

Tammy Winand writes:

Mani Stones are stones featuring carved mantras, most often the Chenrezig Buddha of Compassion mantra, Om Mani Padme Hum. They may be heaped together in mounds or walls, and often appear near Buddhist places of worship (temples, stupas, holy lakes and mountains, or remote places where strong spirit presences are believed to exist).

The following are some examples I have come across during my travels in Tibetan exile communities in northern India.

Mani Stone Outside the Main Temple of His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama-McleodGanj, India

Mani Stones and Image of Guru Rinpoche near Tsuglakhang, McleodGanj

Mani Stones, including a Kalachakra Mantra, at Tsuglakhang

Mani Stone Pile Outside Choekling Monastery in Bir Tibetan Settlement

In 2009, Tammy Winanda came to McleodGanj, India, capital of the Tibetan government in exile and home to HH the 14th Dalai Lama. She became involved in a small non-profit where she volunteered as an English conversation teacher and helped plan events to broaden awareness of the Tibetan situation.

While in McleodGanj, Tammy became acquainted with numerous Tibetan exiles, including former political prisoners, monks and nuns. Their personal stories moved her deeply. When she returned to the US and spoke about her experiences, Tammy realized that a surprising number of people have little or no knowledge of the Tibetan situation. She began to develop Everyday Exile Project, a way to bring the Tibetan situation to a wider audience. It quickly developed into an on-going internet outlet for Tibetan exile voices.

Since April 2011, the focus has shifted to covering news from exile communities and providing information on Tibetan culture and organizations.

She now blogs at Everyday Exile, and has added a companion photojournalism blog at Everyday Exile Photojournalism.

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