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Mantra Meditation

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Padmasambhava mantra

Oṃ Āḥ Hūṃ Vajra Guru Padma Siddhi Hūṃ

(Om Ah Hum Vajra Guru Padma Siddhi Hum)

Padmasambhava was a historical teacher who is said to have finally converted Tibet to Buddhism. He was a renowned scholar, meditator, and magician, and his mantra suggests his rich and diverse nature.

Om Ah Hum have no conceptual meaning.

Om is often regarded as being the primeval sound, and in fact the sound-symbol of reality itself. It represents the universal principle of enlightenment. You can read about Om in more detail on the page about the Om Shanti mantra.

Ah, in traditional explanations, is usually said to be connected with speech (more about that in a moment) but in Sanskrit “ah” is a verb meaning “to express , signify ; to call (by name).” So it suggests evoking, or calling forth, the manifestation of enlightenment.

Hum is often thought of as representing the manifestation of enlightenment in the individual human being. This may be a complete coincidence, but hum is similar to the first person singular “aham,” which means of course “I.”

Often these syllables are associated with body, speech, and mind respectively (i.e. the whole of one’s being). So there’s a suggestion that we are saluting the qualities that Padmasambhava represents with all of our hearts (and minds, and bodies).

Vajra means thunderbolt, and represents the energy of the enlightened mind. It can also mean diamond. The implication is that the diamond/thunderbolt can cut through anything. The diamond is the indestructible object, while the thunderbolt is the unstoppable force. The vajra also stands for compassion. While it may seem odd to have such a “masculine” object representing compassion, this makes sense in esoteric Buddhism because compassion is active, and therefore aligned with this masculine symbol. (The term “masculine” does not of course imply that compassion is limited to males!)

Guru, of course, means a wise teacher. It comes from a root word, garu, which means “weighty.” So you can think of the guru as one who is a weighty teacher. Padmasambhava is so highly regarded in Tibetan Buddhism that he is often referred to as the second Buddha.

PadmasambhavaPadma means lotus, calling to mind the purity of the enlightened mind, because the lotus flower, although growing in muddy water, is completely stainless. In the same way the enlightened mind is surrounded by the greed, hatred, and delusion that is found in the world, and yet remains untouched by it. The lotus therefore represents wisdom. Again, while westerners would tend to assume that the flower represents compassion, the receptive nature of the flower gives it a “feminine” status in esoteric Buddhism, and to the lotus is aligned with the “feminine” quality of wisdom. And once again, there is no implication that wisdom is in any way limited to those who are female. The words masculine and feminine here are used in a technical sense that’s completely unrelated to biology.

And Siddhi means accomplishment or supernatural powers, suggesting the way in which those who are enlightened can act wisely, but in ways that we can’t necessarily understand. Padmasambhava is a magical figure, and in his biography there are many miracles and tussles with supernatural beings.

Click below to hear an MP3 version:

Pronunciation notes:

  • a is pronounced as u in cut
  • aa (ā) is long, as in father
  • m in hum is pronounced ng, as in long
  • j is hard, like j in judge
  • u is short, as in put
  • ū is long, as in school

Comments

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Comment from Aswad Munyir Abdul La’tif Strategic Martial Art Center
Time: January 28, 2008, 10:44 pm

Hotep Pu. Years ago I was in trance and this Archetype appeared to me. I did let it go, but now I know that it was a “coming of age” for me. I am opening Strategic Martial Art Center and I will be teaching meditaition as well as martial arts. If there are any tips, feel free to contact. I have studied meditaion since 1974. I studied with Richard Hickillman on KQED televiton when I was a kid. Hotep Pu.

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Comment from TIBET ARTS
Time: September 1, 2008, 2:47 am

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Comment from Joshua
Time: October 15, 2008, 11:21 pm

If not mistaken, by the form of the mantra, is it possible that Tibetans pronounce this mantra more obscurely? Or is this not the same as the Guru Rinpoche Mantra:
“OM A HUM BENZA GURU PEMA SIDDHI HUM”

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Comment from Bodhipaksa
Time: October 16, 2008, 8:31 am

Hi Joshua.

Yes, Tibetan and Sanskrit are from different language groups, and so Tibetan has very different sounds in it. That makes it hard for Tibetans to pronounce Sanskrit words, and “Vajra” comes out as “Benza” and “Padma” as “Pema.” It’s the same mantra, but pronounced in a different way. Technically it’s incorrect, but since it’s the standard pronunciation in Tibet it doesn’t make much sense to take Tibetans to task over it, any more than it would make sense to correct English-speakers who say “Paris” rather than “Paree.”

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Comment from Joshua
Time: October 16, 2008, 9:44 am

Thank you for your quick reply. I wish I knew of a handbook of some type that taught the general Tibetan pronunciation. I guess it will come with repeated listening, but not knowing what to expect makes it difficult to chant alongside a Tibetan monk, especially one who sings in polyphonic. I have noticed through studying the transliteration of the Tibetan scripts, that there are stark similarities to those of Sanskrit in structure and that some of the letters in the English transliteration are hit-or-miss. There’s probably a dialect thing going on as most of my instruction comes from the Gelukpa tradition. Thanks again for your help!

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Comment from MarSon
Time: January 31, 2009, 4:13 am

Hi Is it okay to chant the Padmasambhava mantra mentaly? and or chant it even if I am not Initiated by a Guru?

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Comment from Bodhipaksa
Time: January 31, 2009, 8:44 am

Hi MarSon.

Yes, it’s fine to chant a mantra internally, and you can chant a mantra without initiation. To use these mantras as Tantric practices requires initiation (wong, or abhisheka), but they can also be done as straightforward Mahayana practices, which requires no initiation. Although no doubt many Tantric practitioners would disagree with this, I stick with the traditional Buddhist view that it’s the state of mind with which you perform a practice that makes it spiritually effective, and not external factors, so I don’t think that Tantric initiation in any way makes a mantra practice more effective.

Some people, of course, lacking confidence in themselves, may believe that they have to have some kind of external validation for their practice and so may be given a boost in confidence through knowing that they have initiation from a guru. I don’t in any way wish to suggest however that there’s no point in having a teacher; a teacher can give valuable guidance and advice and be a support in many ways and for most people progress requires this kind of wise and kind guidance. But ultimately practice is something that we do for ourselves. As the Buddha said on his death-bed, “Be a lamp unto yourselves.” We all have Buddha nature, and we all have the capacity to realize that Buddha nature, and practicing mantras — with or without a guru to provide initiation — can help us with that task.

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Comment from Michele
Time: April 2, 2009, 12:22 pm

Whenever I chant this mantra to myself, I heal. I dont know why. If I feel anxious- I become calm. Once -very wierdly- I had a terrible hangover and a headache- and I chanted this mantra and the hangover with symptoms just disappeared. The headache went ((poof)) and was gone. I actually could jump out of bed and felt fine. How can this be?

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Comment from Michele
Time: April 5, 2009, 2:24 pm

Sorry- maybe I should explain myself. I am not a buddhist. I do not meditate. I cannot “talk shop” with anyone here. I read about this mantra and I said it. At first- it just felt good. Later I found it to be truely healing- and I think what I am asking is: why? How does it work? How can saying some words in a language that I dont even understand make a headache dissappear? Now I have read the other pages on this site – but it still doesnt make sense to me. And I am a medical doctor so I dont take something like this lightly. Can anyone explain to me why saying these words in a foreign language about a man who lived during the 800s in Asia make my headache go away? And does this work for everybody?

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Comment from Bodhipaksa
Time: April 5, 2009, 2:48 pm

Hi Michele,

Sorry, I’d assumed that your previous question was rhetorical. My bad

I’m not big on mystical explanations, so what I’d suggest is that headaches often arise because we’re (largely unconsciously) doing things like worrying, feeling anxious, tensing up, focusing in a narrow way, etc, that cause tension. When you repeat a mantra there’s less mental space available to keep doing the headache-generating activities, and so your mind and body start to relax. In theory I don’t think it would matter much which words you used, although commonly-used words probably take less “bandwidth” to repeat and so you probably would be able to multitask and recite the “mantra” and keep doing the things that cause headaches. Repeating foreign words takes more attention, and so you have to let go of a lot more mental activity in order to do that. Similar things happen when we pay attention to the breath, for example. Because we’re using up our inner bandwidth noticing the sensations of the breath we expend less energy thinking unhelpful thoughts connected with anger, depression, anxiety, etc.

Does this make sense?

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Comment from Michele
Time: April 6, 2009, 1:08 am

I don`t know. Like- the hangover I had was chemical. I had the alcohol in my blood and whatever makes a wine give you a hangover (probably bad wine and/or too much of it! lol). I dont see how my symptoms in such a case could just go “poof* and disappear by concentrating on some words. I have to add that my buddhist cousin talked me into seeing Mother Meera, and since then, things have been somehow different. Maybe I have to try paying attention to my breath as well- as you say- and see what happens then.
I live in Zurich. Do you know of any good teachers of meditation over here? Perhaps I should start that journey.

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Comment from Bodhipaksa
Time: April 6, 2009, 8:39 am

I think that no one can actually “explain” this in any detailed way. But I’d suggest that everything that happens in your brain is chemical, so it’s perhaps not unexpected that meditation can cure a hangover. If, for example, you happened to get into a concentrated and blissful state of mind (what we call dhyana) then this is going to result in chemical changes in the brain. I don’t know what those would be exactly, because although research is being carried out on the effects of meditation on the brain it’s mostly involved using fMRI, which studies which parts of the brain are active but not what’s going on at a chemical level. But lets assume that there was a strong release of endorphins and other chemicals associated with very positive states of mind — those natural opiates may well have been able to overcome the unpleasant (chemical) effects of the hangover. And part of just about any pain we feel isn’t the “pure” pain itself, but the tension that arises around it (to go back to my earlier suggestion), and if you stop generating that secondary pain then that’s going to help too.

I don’t want to downplay the sheer amazingness that is the mind, and the astonishing things that meditation can accomplish. I heartily celebrate all this, along with the mystery of how exactly this thing we call consciousness manages to exist at all, and how it interacts with the brain. It’s all marvelous and mysterious and miraculous (in a very loose sense of that word). Maybe we’ll never entirely understand it. I’m just very wary about the tendency to reach for mystical/miraculous explanations because I don’t think they really explain much. Just as the answer “God did it” in response to the question of why lightening happens didn’t ultimately lead to any real understanding of the world, I’d rather not search for any “miraculous” component in meditation or mantras.

There seem to be a lot of meditation/Buddhism centers in Zürich, according to Google. In some cases I know a little about the organizations that run the centers, but I’m afraid I don’t know anything about the people who would be doing the face-to-face teaching. Sorry I can’t be of more help. If you want to explore breath-based meditation your best bets would be either some kind of Theravadin/Insight group, or a Zen center.

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Comment from Michele
Time: April 7, 2009, 1:25 am

Thanks. I agree with you. I also believe more in scientifically based explanations than the purely mystical, because so much corruption can occur with the latter. And the last thing mankind needs are more “false prophets”.
I`ll google “Theravadin”. I once went to a Buddhist center here and although the people were very kind, I felt there was no guidance.
Wishing you well!

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Comment from Bodhipaksa
Time: April 7, 2009, 4:16 am

Good luck with your searches. A Theravadin (or Theravada — the terms are synonyms) center might be called a “vihara” or a “wat,” so watch out for those terms.

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Comment from urgyen tsering
Time: July 3, 2009, 12:57 am

good explaination on VAJRA GURU MANTRA.keep on gathering more information.

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Comment from mark james packer
Time: August 16, 2009, 12:31 pm

I bow down before the wrath and compassion of the whole. OM MANI VAJRA GURU PEMA SIDDHI HUM.

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Comment from Claire Payne
Time: September 10, 2009, 4:18 am

Hello all

I’ve been searching the internet for a image of how the tibetans write Oṃ Āh Hūṃ Vajra Guru Padma Siddhi Hūṃ. My partner told me about this mantra and we’ve even named our pup Padmasambhava. :)

I would like to have the mantra as a tattoo, but I want it as it’s supposed to be written.

Please can anyone help?

Thank you very much x

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Comment from Bodhipaksa
Time: September 10, 2009, 7:41 am

You can find the mantra written on Visible Mantra.

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Comment from Claire Payne
Time: September 10, 2009, 2:27 pm

Thank you ever so much for your help. I’m extremely grateful. The link was very interesting.

Have a lovely day x

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Comment from mondo
Time: September 19, 2009, 1:17 am

Are you aware that most if not all Tibetan Masters have requested their disciples to recite this mantra millions of times? At first it is a daunting idea to repeat the mantra 100 times perhaps, yet in time and quickening the pace, getting in 1000 in an ‘hour’ becomes do-able. So in 10 hours of recitations one can get to the 100,000 mark. Taking in the ‘post-meditation’ view and reciting while going through the motions of ‘daily life’ allows for extended recitations. After all, Guru Rinpoche is ‘here’ all the time no matter what you are doing.

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Comment from mondo
Time: September 19, 2009, 1:23 am

On ‘Siddhi': Syllabically, could you say SID D’Hii? In Tibetan as spoken by the Xin Hai area, it is said SE DA. There are 3 major dialects in the Tibetan region, so I imagine variations on Siddhi could be different depending on where your Master is.

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Comment from Bodhipaksa
Time: September 21, 2009, 8:58 am

Hi Mondo,

While I’m not entirely sure what pronunciation you’re trying to convey it doesn’t look much like the Sanskrit is actually pronounced. You seem to be emphasizing the “H” while in Sanskrit this is no more than a slight puff of air that accompanies the final “di”. When I’ve heard Tibetans chanting the word “siddhi” they’ve downplayed the “H” even further, so that it sounds more like siddi. BUt I’m sure the mantra is pronounced or mispronounced in different ways by Tibetans of different dialect groups.

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Comment from mondo
Time: September 21, 2009, 12:49 pm

Thanks Bodhipaksa, I take it the ‘h’ in sanscrit is kind of like the ‘h’ in French. Se Da sounds like Suh Duh…not Se Dah. I’m also wondering about the pronounciation of Amoghasiddhi? Being American and seeing ‘Ha’ as in the laugh, or gotcha, I guess I’ve been Americanizing Sanscrit….gandharvi. yet another learning curve. Thanks again.

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Comment from Bodhipaksa
Time: September 21, 2009, 9:38 pm

Hi again.

The “h” isn’t the same as in French, where it’s silent. In Sanskrit it “aspirates” a consonant, so that there’s a small audible puff of air comes out as you say it. You get the sound sometimes in English when you say word combinations like “roundhouse.”

There’s not really a “ha” sound in Amoghasiddhi — “gha” is all one syllable and the “g” runs into the “h”. It’s a bit like the g-h combination in English “big-ham”.

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Comment from mondo
Time: September 21, 2009, 9:56 pm

Great info!!! Say, in Conze’s Large Perfection of Wisdom text, The Lord does say a lot about the syllables/letters, and as you mention, the associated meditations on each…but where does Manjusri go into them?
I’m into Manjusri and really love Conze’s 700 Lines version wherein he explores the Unthinkability Concentration. Yet I’m looking for Manjusri’s focus on the syllables. I sure hope it is free on the web somewhere.
Please show it to me. I feel a great need here.

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Comment from Observer
Time: November 15, 2009, 7:04 pm

To Michele:
The mantras have powerful vibration/energy, which can transform/change even our phisical body and our mind. It can be felt – even if you pronounce just AUM. If you say it 500 times, it can purify and calm!

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Comment from mondo
Time: November 16, 2009, 3:58 am

Just ran across yet another definition/synonym for VAJRA. We all know it is mostly seen as DIAMOND and sometimes as LIGHTNING [BOLT], but now it is also able to been understood as EMPTINESS!!! Reading Conze’s translations of the PrajnaParamita Sutras where Emptiness is such a foundational word, I find several times Akshobhya is brought into the sutras. He being the ‘father’ of the Vajra Family, I identify with that particular ‘Family’ of Buddhas. With the view that Samantabhadra is the ultimate of Emptiness/the Dharmakaya Buddha, emanating from Him is a group of Buddhas: VajraPani, VajraSattva, and VajraDhara which all have this VAJRA initially in their ‘Names’…. From them emanates the 5 Families of Buddhas: Vairocana, Amoghasiddi, Akshobhya, Ratnasambhava and Amitabha. Yet as Manjusri would say, even these Buddhas are non-existent. So looking at the word ‘exist’ I seem to recall ‘ist’ is a german word meaning something like ‘being’ and ‘ex’ would entail a process concerning ‘being’…like thinking. Hence, as I’d again suggest Manjusri is focusing ‘nonexistence’ on what Conze translates as ‘unthinkable’ to mean ‘pre-thought’, ‘post-thought’ or even ‘non-thought’…what seems to me like the silent stillness of Akshobhya wherein ‘the small voice’ is heard. In the 700 lines, Conze does mention Buddha’s explanation about the One Single Array concentration. Seems to be a synonym for the Unthinkability Concentration. Having lots of fun wandering in ‘The Range’.

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Comment from John
Time: March 9, 2010, 1:31 pm

Hey Bodhipaksa

I was just wondering, why did you leave out the visarga in āḥ in the mantra and replace it with an “h”?

Thanks, your website is great!

John

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Comment from Bodhipaksa
Time: March 9, 2010, 1:49 pm

Hi John,

The short answer is “sheer carelessness.” Thanks for being so sharp-eyed. It’s fixed now.

All the best,
Bodhipaksa

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Comment from John
Time: March 9, 2010, 2:30 pm

Hey Bodhipaksa,

Your welcome. I don’t mean to nit-pick you but I hope that you put how to pronounce it in the pronunciation notes. :-) I’d be interested to hear how you pronounce it. From the audio file (if that’s you) it sounds as if you could be slightly breathing out after the “ā”. I’ve heard so many different ways of pronouncing it, such as an faint echo of the preceding vowel (I’ve heard others say that you don’t say the faint echo if it’s midverse) and then I’ve heard it said that it’s a slight aspiration or exhale after the vowel. It’s all terribly confusing.

Thanks,
John

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Comment from Bodhipaksa
Time: March 9, 2010, 2:51 pm

I’m afraid I can’t be of any definitive help. The way I’ve been taught to chant āḥ, it sounds like what the doctor asks you to say when he wants to look at your throat. But that may be incorrect.

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Comment from John
Time: March 9, 2010, 3:54 pm

Hey Bodhipaksa,

Is that because of Sandhi rules? I’ve wondered whether that applied to mantras. Does it? Because if I does you might be right, but I don’t know. I bought the book Samskrta-Subodhini: A Sanskrit Primer thinking that it would help me learn Sanskrit so I could better pronounce mantras and it says that a visarga when preceded by an “ā” and followed by a voiced consonant or vowel, is dropped. The “h” in hūṃ is a voiced consonant so in this case you could be correct but I don’t know. I’ve never taken a class on Sanskrit or Pali or anything Indian related. I’m really an amateur or even less than one.

Thanks,
John

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Comment from Bodhipaksa
Time: March 9, 2010, 4:05 pm

I studied Pali for a couple of years at university, but we didn’t go much into sandhi rules. The person to ask about this would be jayarava, over at http://www.visiblemantra.org. He’s studying Sanskrit and is a specialist in mantras and Indic scripts.

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Comment from John
Time: March 9, 2010, 4:23 pm

Hello Bodhipaksa,

I already asked him and he was very helpful. Jayarava answered all my questions how to pronounce this particular mantra. Sanskrit can be so tricky. I was taught to pronounce the Vajra Guru mantra pretty much like you, with the āḥ sounding like what you described with going to the doctor, though I was taught Padma was Pema instead. Jayarava recommended your website for another perspective.

Thanks,
John

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Comment from daywalker
Time: October 18, 2010, 7:40 pm

More and more it becomes clear to me that Buddhism is in fact a holy science of the way things are. Western science already proved that electrons, atoms, neutrons, protons, etc. etc. do not exist as little hard balls (particles) but are properties from waves such as inertia, standing waves, interference, spin, vortex, implosion, etc. etc. Buddhism said the same thing many centuries ago that there is no objective world “out there” but only phenomena rising and fading on the stages of different levels of consciousness. Hard to grasp but the only way things ultimately can be.

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Comment from juan-carlos mojica
Time: November 4, 2010, 7:34 pm

great…more input for the soul…thank you….from Mayaguez,Puerto Rico.

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Comment from James
Time: January 8, 2011, 10:18 am

Thanks for the wonderful explanation of this mantra. It has had excellent beneficial effects for me already. I am considering using this mantra over a long period of time, maybe reciting a few sets of 109 a day (the amount of beads on my necklace). I have been interested in Buddhism for many years and meditate and study a bit. But only through your explanations of mantra and my own awareness have I ‘got’ the point of it and I’d like to extend these benefits! Peace Jim

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Comment from Bodhipaksa
Time: January 8, 2011, 11:02 am

Hi, James.

I’m glad to hear you’re enjoying this mantra. The Padmasabhava mantra is the mantra and visualization practice I was given at my ordination.

I’d guess that the 109th bead on your mala is the “guru” bead. Usually this is larger than the others and it marks the start and end of the circle. Traditionally it’s not counted as part of the round.

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Comment from mondo
Time: January 8, 2011, 12:35 pm

Hey Bodhipaksa, can you go more into the Siddhi feature? And are you aware that most Tibetan Disciples have been requested to do 12million recitations? It seems like a couple of years ago the Dalai Lama, the Karmapa and just about all Rinpoches have made this request of their disciples. At rinpoche.com was an aritcle on the Guru Rinpoche Mantra. In it Yeshe Tsogyal asks Padmasambhava to explain it. Very interesting to say the least.

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Comment from James
Time: January 8, 2011, 2:07 pm

I saw on wikipedia about numbers of recitations and I thought it said 1.2 million to get the blessing of Padmasambhava. I thought I could do that in 30 years but 12 million – mmm that’s probably a bit too many for me!

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Comment from Bodhipaksa
Time: January 8, 2011, 9:25 pm

Hi, Mondo.

Siddhi is a word meaning “success” or “attainment,” but it’s used also as a term for “magical power.” There are traditional lists of siddhis (or iddhis, in Pali):

“Having been one, he becomes many; having been many, he becomes one; he appears and vanishes; he goes unhindered through a wall, through a rampart, through a mountain as though through space; he dives in and out of the earth as though it were water; he walks on water without sinking as though it were earth; seated cross-legged, he travels in space like a bird; with his hands he touches and strokes the moon and sun so powerful and mighty; he exercises mastery with the body as far as the brahmā world.”

Although the idea of siddhis was present (even common) in early Buddhism, it really took off in Mahayana and Tantric Buddhism. Those who have mastered the siddhis are known as siddhas, and there’s a traditional list of 84 Mahasiddhas that includes some well-knowns like Santideva, Naropa, and Tilopa. The mahasiddhas were very unconventional and didn’t practice monastic Buddhism. Instead they lived in forests, or mountains, or in cremation grounds, and they liked to shock. I think it was Naropa who encountered Tilopa frying live fish. Naropa was shocked, but it turned out that Tilopa was using his magic powers to send the fish off to better rebirths. You get the idea! Downman’s book, “Masters of Mahāmudrā: Songs and Histories of the Eighty-Four Mahasiddhas” is worth dipping into.

Padmasambhava is seen as a Mahasiddha (although he’s not on the list of 84). Throughout his biography (The Life and Liberation of Padmasambhava) he demonstrates a mastery of the siddhis, such as surviving being burned at the stake, taming demons, flying through the air, etc. Of course the ultimate siddhi is Enlightenment, and Padmasambhava masters that as well.

I wasn’t aware about the 12 million recitations. As far as I knew, sets of 100,000 were standard. 12 million seems a bit like overkill!

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Comment from mondo
Time: January 9, 2011, 5:21 am

Overkill over and over again and again. I can tell you once you get around the 3 million range they become much faster. At first you just do the recitations using the mala a few times a day. Sacred times sort of. Then it comes to you Padmasambhava does not sleep and is always with you. So you can then recite at all times of the day transforming the entire day into ‘Sacred Time’. The key is visualizing your master on His lostus seat on top of your head. The lenth from your elbow to the tip of your fingers is the size of the visualization. Instead of reflecting on His being there a few times in the turn of the mala, He is there all the time. Around the 3 millionth time you invoke the word/idea: fast or quick. 25,000 a day is no problem then.
Now the Siddhi’s have always been with you. It is just a matter of recognition as so much of your self is. The skillful means of mantra using the sacred syllables reverberates these ‘latent’ or dormant features of The Real Self causing us to return to awareness. In so doing the ‘accomplishments’ become our natural way of being. Think about it. To even hear of The Gurr Rinpoche Mantra is rare. To be initiated into reciting it is incredibly amazing. This means you are on the ‘fast track’, or ‘One lifetime’ express. Why? To me in the Prajnaparamita when The Tathagata says, “The reason you love to hear The Prajanparamita Sutra is because you have sat at the feet of many Buddhas before in lifetimes uncountable and all you want to hear is The Prajnaparamita Sutra over and over again.” This same ‘in-struction’ goes without saying also for The Guru Rinpoche Mantra and the many other mantras. We have been doing The Mantrayana for uncountable lifetimes already and can look forward to more of The Same.
There are Rinpoche’s who have done over 100 million recitations of The Guru Rinpoche Mantra…really. Hey, walking through mountains, flying across the sky, the Siddhi’s accomplish much more than we can imagine. Just letting the Siddhis get it on and enjoying the trip doiing what you gotta do…have fun.

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Comment from James
Time: January 9, 2011, 9:40 am

Wonderful stories – perhaps we need these super-hero characters to look up to, to inspire us – it certainly appeals to my imagination. And that helps with successful meditations I feel. But I do take it all with a pinch of salt too!

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Comment from James
Time: January 9, 2011, 9:57 am

I’m inspired and I look forward to Padmasambhava being with me always :-)

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Comment from nick ward
Time: March 8, 2011, 7:37 am

you write with beautiful clarity on the benefits of mantra-meditation and I am about to link you to my site! Thank you.

It is interesting, I think, that the power of mantra meditation is fast becoming the cutting-edge of elite sport science.

Nick Ward

marathon sculler
http://nickwardscenarios.wordpress.com/2009/08/10/sculling-log/

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Comment from mondo
Time: March 8, 2011, 12:56 pm

Quite a site you have there Nick. When I get news of my friend Ryan’s work on the video of Padmasambhava’s Life I’ll post it here too. James, it is just a matter of coming to know what already is. Padmasambhava has always been with you. The Buddha is within. A Buddha by any other name is still The Buddha. The is only one Buddha. Some say Padmasambhava and others say Samantabhadra… Padmasambhava was the Nirmanakaya for over 1,000 years. Even then He met with Garab Dorje also a Nirmanakaya. I once heard a great professor say, “Only a Master can truely understand another Master.” We have the task of setting aside our ‘selfishness’ in order to let our Self see, hear, speak, etc. The Parinirvana Sutra is so incredibly parallel to Socrates’ last dialogue. We never die, we just transform…on and on.
On Siddhis: Bodhipaksa, great job. Been wondering about ‘The Waters of the Deep’ and how Nargajuna dived into the ocean and found The Prajnaparamita Sutras at The Great Naga’s. My Master’s name: LongYang in Tibetan means Ocean in English. As an emanation of Manjusri The Perfection of Wisdom and The Great Perfection go smoothly together. This tankha I have of the Goddess of The Perfection of Wisdom has a vajra suspended on the palm of her right hand and of course she holds The Prajnaparamita in her left hand…it seems The Vajra is the key to the perfection of wisdom as it is the key to the great perfection. The vajra is held in Guru Rinpoche’s right hand. Could you elaborate more extensively about the meaning(s) of The Vajra? I’d sure appreciate it man.

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Comment from Bodhipaksa
Time: March 8, 2011, 1:03 pm

“Naga” was term used for Arhants, so it’s possible that when people say Nagarjuna got the PP Sutras from the Nagas he was really going into the forest to record sayings that had been preserved by solitary renunciates. There are certain sections of the Pali canon that are strikingly similar to the early PP literature.

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Comment from mondo
Time: March 8, 2011, 1:19 pm

I was always fascinated by the ‘arjuna’ aspect in Nagarjuna at first I guess because of his role in Bhagavad Gita. Then seeing how in so many sutras there are the ‘openings’ listing so many different ‘beings’ present with nagas being so prevalent along with arhants, bodhisattvas etc. But good to know the association of nagas and arhants. Solitary, in the forests, renunciates, yes…’we’ are the ‘waters of the deep’ and ‘the ocean’ along with being nagas too I guess. In Conze’s Saptasatika The Buddha kind of finishes it up with a concentration focusing on stillness of body and mind and says at a ‘moment’ you will hear a Buddha say his name. At that time, turn in his direction and he will tell you more sutras than have ever been recorded. These forest renunciates no doubt go into this concentration from which PP comes along with so much more.
The Ocean is deep. Thanks for your immediate response.

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Comment from nick ward
Time: March 9, 2011, 5:01 am

When was Padmasambhava born? You ask me this question, Mondo on my site… and that pleases me no end! You write beautifully, engagingly, tellingly. Thank you.

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Comment from nick ward
Time: March 9, 2011, 9:44 am

Mondo, When I asked Lama Ole to define ‘Naga’ I was thinking Nagajuna, lizard kings and snakes, he replied: think High Finance!

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Comment from mondo
Time: March 9, 2011, 3:49 pm

High Finance??? Lizard is the lesser of 3 animal representatives for the sign Scorpio which has something to do with ‘other peoples money’. The other two reps for Scorpio are scorpion of course and the Eagle/Garuda. Nagarjuna going into the forest or diving into the depths…all brings me to the solitary renunciate view of stillness…The Vajra Family. Following Avalokitesvara and Manjusri in The Surangama Sutra ‘looking’ at the path of Hearing requires complete stillness so that one can clearly reflect. In such a way the Diamond is a great metaphore yet its essence, its ‘light’ is emptiness. Both Avalokitesvara and Manjusri had to ‘Leap Over’ the void to arrive on the other shore of Englightenment. The ‘Leap Over’ feature is the ultimate yoga of Dzogchen whereby one arrives in The Pure Land of Samantabhadra; Akinistha which is also the central buddha family of Vairocana: The Tathagata Family. Thereupon both Avalokitesvara and Manjusri were emmersed in an ocean of compassion and had to return for the sake of those remaining behind.

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Pingback from Marathon Sculling Log 2 « Nick Ward Scenarios
Time: March 10, 2011, 6:56 am

[...] this yoga site for convincing explanations of why mantra-mediation generates power and endurance:  http://www.wildmind.org/mantras/figures/padmasambhava and, above all, become the peace of mind of an emmanating Buddha… or just win that Gold [...]

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Comment from nick ward
Time: March 10, 2011, 8:17 am

perhaps the way things are we need to leap over the world of High Finance – yeah his response puzzled me too – at the time I was mantra-sculling for hours and hours every day so was in a highly energized-receptive state and living on next to nothing… just a few dollars from busking in Perth, West Australia – and cycling mantra many clicks a week too… perhaps he was just getting me look at things the way I didn’t want to… High Finance!!! Not my world… thanks for the response. Perhaps I just need to get back in a boat… interested by the Dalai Lama’s renouncing ‘political’ power announced here in UK on BBC this morning… strange times… new thinking

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Comment from mondo
Time: March 10, 2011, 12:03 pm

Hey Nick, seems the Dalai Lama is making a great move. My take on the Tibet question: prior to Mao’s invasion Tibet was rather remote and resistant to foreigners showing up. You know Marx starts off with “Religion is the opiate of the masses.” and for the young revolutionary Mao the term Opiate in China was a particularly deadly desease. Hence his view on religion and the need to get rid of it. His army going to Tibet ultimately led to the removal of many high lamas along with The Dalai Lama to India form where they have proliferated around the world spreading the secrets of Tibetan Buddhism. In a way ironically what Mao did with his army was to spread this religion to a vast population which could never get to Tibet. Now The Dalai Lama is not just the Dalai Lama of Tibet. He is The Dalai Lama of The World. Whereas Mao is a historical figure whose time has come and gone. His role in the evolution of man’s spiritual dimension is tricky to figure. Perhaps unwittingly we all go through our lives hardly knowing what we are doing just like Mao. We think we are doing this when actually we are doing that. Hindsight is 20-20 and being caught up in the moment is usually charged with such intense emotional obscurations it is hard to know what is really happening today/now. Yet the wheel keeps on turning. Padmasambhava turned the wheel into Mantrayana and Longchenpa gave it a boost which Jigme Lingpa accelerated. Yet the wheel remains the same. I wonder when you are flowing over the water in your skull is it the water that moves, the skull that moves, the air, the mantra? Even though you exert physically does the world stream by you as you sit there still or are you moving through the world?

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Comment from nick ward
Time: March 10, 2011, 1:58 pm

I glide the stream with crystalline alchemy, Mondo – on a good day – but truth not as dedicated practice since working as a boatman on the Thames at Hammersmith in 2007…

The point you make about the diaspora benefitting Western rollingminders etc is profound and was first made to me by Geshe Thubten Tenzin (the Dalai Lama’s blood brother) in Darwin, Australia in late 2004 when he graciously gave me the Dharma name Thubten Trinley (‘Tingley’ the clown was born that very day and earned me right livelhood with the banjo in Subiaco Market in 2005!)… this wondefully patient, kind and bookish monk also gave me a copy of Enlightenment in the Palm of your Hand – because it caught my eye. The river is in my mind. hey, dude, gd to chat…

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Comment from mondo
Time: March 10, 2011, 3:01 pm

To deepen this Guru Rinpoche Mantra work I’d suggest Lama Anagarika Govinda’s THE WAY OF THE WHITE CLOUDS. Back in 1969 I hardly knew what I was reading. The story of Padmasambhava ‘racing’ a Bon priest to the top of Mt. Kailas was a simple story of Him using His Siddhi’s in a small miraculous way. Of course since then much has become clearer. “…Palm of Your Hand” I read back in ’91 and got hit with “treat everyone as if they were your mother in a previous life.” I now take it as fact that each and everyone one of us have indeed been each other’s mother, father, sister, brother etc. in previous lives. Kind of like: …infinity in the palm of your hand. As The Heart Sutra says: no birth and no death…no duality. Om ah aum banzar guru padme setta hung.

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Pingback from Obama, Tiger Woods and the Dalai Lama « Nick Ward Scenarios
Time: March 11, 2011, 9:32 am

[...] popular imagination! In the last couple of days I have been posting messages on this excellent site http://www.wildmind.org/mantras/figures/padmasambhava on the benefits of mantra-meditation with a specific focus on my speciality sculling-mantra. I [...]

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Pingback from Buddhist self-destruction: the tragedy of Tibet « Nick Ward Scenarios
Time: March 11, 2011, 9:53 am

[...] popular imagination! In the last couple of days I have been posting messages on this excellent site http://www.wildmind.org/mantras/figures/padmasambhava on the benefits of mantra-meditation with a specific focus on my speciality sculling-mantra. I [...]

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Comment from Nene
Time: April 4, 2011, 5:17 am

Hi Bodipaksa,

When I was in Dhanakosa there was a little note on the notice board, and it said that

Om – means the ultimate in the universe
Ah – means the process of transformation and
Hum – means the ultimate realised in me.

I really really like this translation, don’t know where it comes from. I think it was Larry who put it up (if you know him)

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Comment from Bodhipaksa
Time: April 4, 2011, 10:16 am

Hi, Nene.

I thought I had written pretty much the same on the site somewhere, but I haven’t been able to find it! Many mantras start with Om, which is reality itself, and end with Hum, which is the realization of reality within the individual. And whatever comes in between those two is the path. So in Om manipadme hum, for example, manipadme (an alternative name for Avalokiteshvara) is the means to get from the principle of enlightenment to its realization.

Oh, I just remembered, after much head-scratching, that those comments are not on the site, but are on the Sacred Sound CD that Sunada and I put together.

I may know Larry, by the way. I met a Larry who was Ratnadevi’s partner, many years ago.

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Comment from Nene
Time: April 4, 2011, 12:19 pm

That’s beautiful, thank you. You mean Sunada from Boston?

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Comment from Nene
Time: April 4, 2011, 12:20 pm

ps, yes, that’s the Larry

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Comment from Bodhipaksa
Time: April 4, 2011, 12:20 pm

Yes, indeed!

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Comment from Nene
Time: April 4, 2011, 12:46 pm

you mean Sunada?

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Comment from Bodhipaksa
Time: April 4, 2011, 6:04 pm

Yes.

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Comment from Nene
Time: April 5, 2011, 7:33 am

How interesting. How do you know her? I never met her, but recently emailed with her. I am planning to go to that region at the end of the year and can’t wait to meet people from the Boston sangha. She said they ‘only’ have 15 order members, but here in Newcastle there are only 4! I am also SO curious how the American buddhists are. I lived in the Boston area for 2.5 years (happiest time of my life so far) but wasn’t into Buddhism then. I did go there, very nice, but one had to attend lectures and had read so many books then that I couldn’t bear more theory. Anyway. Do you know about Kripalu Centre by any chance? As that is where I plan to go.
ps, guess this is not good for public posting this piece of text I just wrote…
Nene

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Comment from Bodhipaksa
Time: April 5, 2011, 2:02 pm

Hi, Nene.

Sunada writes and teaches on Wildmind, and she’s in my chapter, so I know her quite well.

I think you misunderstood what she wrote to you. There aren’t fifteen Order members in Boston — there are just two or three. I think she was talking about the core group at her center (which is currently homeless). There’s a couple of dozen Order members up her at Aryaloka, in New Hampshire.

I’ve never been to Kripalu. I’ve heard it’s huge…

All the best,
Bodhipaksa

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Comment from Peter
Time: June 20, 2011, 2:37 pm

Isn’t Om in this mantra equal to Om in Om Mani Pad-Me Hum?
There it stands for A U M, wich is the inpure body, inpure speech and inpure mind of the practisioner and also the Pure enlightened body, Pure enlightened speech and Pure enlightened mind of the Buddha and has a purifying quality.

According to his holiness the Dalai Lama in Kindness, Clarity and Insight from Jeffrey Hopkins

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Comment from Bodhipaksa
Time: June 21, 2011, 7:46 pm

Yes, the Om in this mantra is the same as the Om in the Avalokiteshvara mantra. I don’t know of any Buddhist text that breaks om down into A-U-M, although that’s done in the post-Buddhist Upanishadic tradition.

I have to say, though, that Tibetans have a mania for making numerical correspondences, so that the six syllables of Om Mani Padme Hum are seen as corresponding to the six realms on the wheel of life, etc. I wouldn’t therefore take the Dalai Lama’s view on Om/Aum too seriously.

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Pingback from Banjo Nick on tour « Nick Ward Scenarios
Time: July 14, 2011, 8:19 am

[...] this yoga site for convincing explanations of why mantra-mediation generates power and endurance:  http://www.wildmind.org/mantras/figures/padmasambhava and, above all, become the peace of mind of an emmanating Buddha… or just win that Gold medal [...]

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Comment from Jon Lennart Aasenden
Time: August 23, 2011, 3:47 pm

When listening to the mantra .. are you sure this is correct?
Americans seem to round off sounds, so vajra sounds like va-jahj-ra – but it should be with and I (as in the word “india”). Va-I-ra.
I have never heard a tibetan or a hindu pronounce vajra with round sounds.

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Comment from Bodhipaksa
Time: August 23, 2011, 4:27 pm

Hi, Jon.

I’m not very sure what you mean by “round sounds,” or exactly what you’re trying to represent with your phonetic representations. I studied Pali, which is not quite the same as Sanskrit, I know, but close enough, for two years at university, so I’m reasonably confident in my pronunciations. Of course I don’t pronounce everything perfectly, and sometimes I slip up.

The “v” in vajra is pronounced about half-way between a standard English “w” and a standard English “v” (I do not do a good job of getting my V’s right).

Both A’s resemble the vowel in the English word “cut.”

The “j” is hard, as in “judge,” although Americans wrongly tend to make it soft, as in French “je.”

Could you be a bit more specific about which bit you think might be wrong?

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Comment from Stephen
Time: October 20, 2011, 7:42 am

Hello There
I feel at a bit of a loss at the moment.
I’ve been calling myself a Buddhist for several years, meditating, studying, lived in a buddhist community etc. At the moment I am going through a hard period in my life and am continually being swept away by anger and negativity. I’m trying to go deeper and transform those deep energies by studying Padmasambhava and chanting his mantra, but the feelings of anger, resentment, lack of self worth keep over whelming me. I’m not in good conditions at the moment and won’t be for a while- maybe this is an opportunity, but I feel defeated by life. any words of advice, encouragement?
Metta
Steve

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Comment from mondo
Time: October 20, 2011, 10:29 am

Hi Metta Steve, perhaps you know when Guru Rinpoche first came to Tibet there was a big problem with getting a monastery built. He used a mantra to turn it all around in a hurry and it seems like maybe this would help your situational circumstances too. Here it is:

A Ka Sa Ma Ra Tsa
Sa Ta Ra Ra Sa
Ma Ra Ya PHAT!!!

It rolls along fairly plainly until you get to PHAt which should be explosively pronounced.

I’d say try this one a few times a day for at least a week or so. Meanwhile keep up with saying his mantra the rest of the day. It is always best to have your Guru pronounce this for you so that you can get the intonation and say it like he does.

Good luck with your circumstances.

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Comment from Bodhipaksa
Time: October 20, 2011, 12:14 pm

Hi, Steve.

I sympathize.

My best advice would be to develop more self-compassion. You’re suffering during these bouts of anger and negativity, but our usual response to this, when we’re not blaming others, is to feel disappointed in ourselves, to blame ourselves.

Right now, call to mind something you feel resentful about. Be mindful as you let the resentment enter your mind. Now become aware of where the suffering connected with this resentment is located in the body. It may be in the gut, it may be in the heart, it may be elsewhere. Now recognize that suffering is present, and accept it. Allow it to be there. It’s natural to suffer, and it’s not a sign we’ve failed. It’s just a sign we’re alive.

Treat the suffering as if it was a dear friend who was in distress, and who had turned up on your doorstep. What would you ideally do? Cheer him up? Turn him away? Tell him to snap out of it? I suspect the best thing we can do is to mindfully be with the suffering friend until he’s ready to tell us what’s going on. Probably just knowing that he has a friend who is empathetic will reduce his pain by 90%.

Having accepted your suffering, send it lovingkindness. Bear the suffering tenderly in mind as you repeat, “May you be well; may you be happy; may you be free from suffering.” Don’t expect anything to happen. Just empathetically and compassionately accept your pain and wish it well.

Almost every time, doing this allows me to break out of a reactive cycle, and to feel whole again. It often allows me to move on, so that I can turn my compassion outward, toward others.

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Comment from Tenzin
Time: December 7, 2011, 12:05 pm

Can some one plz comment on Termas ( treasures ) and Tertons.

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Comment from mondo
Time: December 7, 2011, 11:01 pm

Tulku Thondup has written a commentary on The Third Dodrupchen’s work on Tertons and Termas. I suggest you get a copy and find the answers there. There are a variety of Termas which are/were hidden treasures of Padmasambhava to be discovered ‘later’ to continue his teachings. A Terton is the one who finds these Treasures which are either mind-transmissions or dakini scripts which he has to translate. It’s a little complicated, so read HIDDEN TEACHINGS OF TIBET: AN EXPLANATION OF THE TERMA TRADITION OF TIBETAN BUDDHISM.

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Comment from taran
Time: March 7, 2012, 3:23 am

to STEPHEN
http://www.youtube.com/user/Adyashanti

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Comment from Sarah
Time: August 29, 2012, 1:08 pm

Thank you for the mantra- I was rereading the Tibetan Book of Living and Dying, found Padmasambhava’s picture on P. 70, mantra written on p. 71 – and was strongly moved. Came to google, to see if I could hear the mantra. It is amazing how deeply the picture alone creates energy and hope – will repeat the mantra as I hear it on this site. The author(Sogyal Rinpoche) writes the way Tibetans speak it, but has the sounds given in your mantra on the site. I have enjoyed reading the comments and would like to link up with other people of like mind in Canada.

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Comment from Ben reel
Time: September 3, 2012, 3:34 pm

Hi
I am a singer songwriter and have used a chant in one of my songs “om padme siddhi hum” is this a correct chant ? Or does it matter
Thanks
Ben

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Comment from Bodhipaksa
Time: September 3, 2012, 3:37 pm

It’s not a mantra, but it means something. Perhaps you’ve invented a new mantra!

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Comment from mondo
Time: September 3, 2012, 8:26 pm

Singing ‘vajra songs’ is a good thing according to Longchenpa. I suggest you work on incorporating the complete mantra. Why? A new insight for me is this mantra, Om Ah Aum Vajra Guru Padma Siddhi Hum is Manjusri’s Crown. ‘Om Ah Aum’ is like a benediction amisdt the Buddha Families.
Vajra/Akshobya,
Guru/Ratnasambhava,
Padma/Amitabha,Siddhi/Amogasiddhi,
Hum/Vairocana.
This being the Crown of The Crown Prince; Manjusri.

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Comment from Steve
Time: January 8, 2013, 10:15 am

Hi
Do you know if this version is avaible annywhere on mp3?

oṃ āḥ hūṃ vajraguru pema thöthrengtsal vajrasamaya jāḥ siddhiphāla hūṃ āḥ

Steve

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Comment from Bodhipaksa
Time: January 8, 2013, 10:49 am

That’s one of my favorite mantras, but I don’t know of it being anywhere online. I might record it myself…

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Comment from nene
Time: January 8, 2013, 3:30 pm

Would you then put the link at the bottom of this conversation please? I am curious!

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Comment from Bodhipaksa
Time: January 8, 2013, 3:42 pm

Will do. This particular mantra is for one of the manifestations of Padmasambhava, called Totreng Tsal, who looks like a cross between Padmasambhava and Vajrapani.

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Comment from budaheartie
Time: January 20, 2013, 9:13 pm

To the person who felt surprised to have her hangover headache removed by reciting Guru Rinpoche´s mantra, at the begining of the messages, it seems quite a message for the rational mind, to have the signs of drunkenness being removed by the great mantra that brings intrinsic awareness to the forefront of our beings… a clear symbolic sign of the workings of this mysterious and otherworldly mantra.
May the light of Guru Rinpoche shines through all and bless us with the nectar of freedom and self liberation
blessings to all

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Comment from Andrea
Time: March 6, 2013, 3:53 pm

Hi Bodhipaksa, Nene and Steve. You can download an .mp3 of the Totreng Tsal mantra chanted by Chagdud Tulku Rinpoche at: http://www.mp3hamster.net/muz/tulku%20rinpoche. You’ll have to scroll down the page to find it, but it’s 3:24 minutes long. Enjoy!

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Comment from SarahLotus
Time: April 22, 2013, 6:15 pm

Regarding Michelle’s comment on the mantra clearing her hangover, I would just like to tell you the unexpected but amazing healing I have received through connecting with Padmasambhava.
I have had severe food intolerance/allergies for 25 years, and it’s made my life very difficult – I’ve regularly suffered from severe 5 day migraines and exhaustion for most of my life to do with problems with many foods.
For a few months, I occasionally did a bit of guru yoga or the unifying practice(imagining lights emanating from Guru Rinpoche into myself). One day, I looked at a poster of padmasambhava I have on my bedroom wall – I spontaneously felt energy welling up in my abdomen and through my body. I found myself jumping from the energy. It was quite a shock.
My food intolernace is healed 80% in 3 months after connecting with padmasambhava – I ask him to heal me now, and extend the healing to any one in the universe who would like to recieve it.
As for rational explanations – there is magic in the universe, Padmasambhava has always been regarded as the magician, there is much in the world that our brains cannot explain – I think there is beauty is accpeting this and not having to rationalise it.

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Comment from Ananda
Time: July 27, 2013, 9:44 am

Dear Bodhipaksha,

Greetings and many thanks for this wonderful website. :-) I was wondering If I could clear a few doubts with you.

1) Okay so, in your pages you have said that the hum seed syllable has to be pronounced as hung (i.e. the last m sound is pronounced as ‘ng’ sound). I want to ask you if the pronunciation of hum with the ‘m’ sound is incorrect. As far as my knowledge goes, in the Sanskrit language, the correct pronunciation would be with the original m sound…e.g. as in dum, kleem, kreem etc. [However, often in the tantra traditions, we do in fact replace the m sound with the ng sound]. So, would it be incorrect to recite the mantra as Om Ma-ni Pad-me Hum (m sound)?

2) The second question is, it seems that in many mantras, we have an amalgamation of the Original Sanskrit pronunciations mixed up with Tibetan dialectic variations. Is this common for the Vajrayana tradition? For example, the Mantra Om Ah Hum Vajra Guru Padma Siddhi Hum appears in many places as Om ah Hum Vajra [Not Benza] Guru Pema Siddhi Hum.

I have a third question regarding the Bhaisajyaguru Mantra but I will post that in the Bhaisajyaguru Page itself.

Much Love and Metta to you _/|\_,

Ananda :-)

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Pingback from My mitra ceremony | Dark Purple Moon
Time: September 18, 2013, 7:42 am

[…] was extremely nervous all day, really nervous and it was Pamadsamvada day. During the day we chanted the mantra and heard the teaching about six times. This is the first […]

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Pingback from Dream Journal the second – Fractal Society and the Fetish of the Individual
Time: October 14, 2013, 4:11 am

[…] Fifteen minutes after I finished writing the above, i remembered that i woke up saying “Om, Ah, Hum, Vajra Guru Padma Siddhi Hum.” Which isn’t one of the mantras i usually […]

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Comment from travlinjay
Time: September 8, 2014, 12:31 pm

I don’t know where or when I came across the Padmasambhava Mantra, for the past few years I have been saying the mantra silently over and over during those times I would lie awake in the middle of the night. It sometimes feels like minutes, other times an hour or so though that makes no difference. I keep returning my mind to the mantra, eventually I find I am waking up hours later well rested and calm realizing I must have fallen back into blissful sleep. I find a place in me that feels nurtured and loved as this happens and I keep returning to this cycle that has developed in my life.

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Comment from Bodhipaksa
Time: September 8, 2014, 4:41 pm

That’s lovely, Travlinjay. Sadhu!

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Comment from Peter
Time: October 21, 2014, 8:15 pm

“More and more it becomes clear to me that Buddhism is in fact a holy science of the way things are.” – how beautifully said!

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Comment from Peter
Time: October 21, 2014, 8:17 pm

“Buddhism said the same thing many centuries ago that there is no objective world “out there” but only phenomena rising and fading on the stages of different levels of consciousness. Hard to grasp but the only way things ultimately can be.”

Holy shit. best description of ONEness, I’ve read in a very long time.

Bless

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Comment from Peter
Time: October 21, 2014, 8:22 pm

“So you can then recite at all times of the day transforming the entire day into ‘Sacred Time’.”

this page is getting so good. HAH!

BLESS

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Comment from Peter
Time: October 21, 2014, 8:31 pm

and to actually contribute something. here’s a fantastic version of the mantra:

http://youtu.be/ynSWoeQYsTE?list=RD_UrLQSxsQfU

Just so freaking ALIGNED with the, dare I say, Spirit of Guru!!?

Get on it.

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Comment from Peter
Time: October 21, 2014, 9:14 pm

ALSO!

I always wanted to ask this. You think that HEARING mantras has any ummm ‘merit’ as they say. Well… apart from the enjoyment of it, that is. hah!

BLESS ya’ll!

Peter

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Comment from Bodhipaksa
Time: October 22, 2014, 10:38 pm

Anything done with skillful attitudes like mindfulness and reverence has a beneficial effect (or “generates merit” if you prefer that language).

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