About the meditation practices you can learn on Wildmind

Home About the meditation practices you can learn on Wildmind

At Wildmind we're committed to bringing practical information on meditation to anyone who has internet access. We realize that not everyone is able to get to a face-to-face meditation class (although if that's possible we recommend that you make the effort) and we want the benefits of meditation to be available to all.

Posture workshop

If you don't already have a meditation practice (and perhaps even if you do) we suggest starting with our posture workshop, which takes you step-by-step through the process of setting up a meditation posture that will allow you to be both alert and relaxed.

Mindfulness of breathing

The mindfulness of breathing is a fundamental meditation practice that everyone should know. The benefits? You'll find that this practice helps you to calm your mind so that there's less inner chatter (especially the stuff that makes you unhappy). You'll find also that you're less distractible, less emotionally reactive, and better able to pay attention.

Developing lovingkindness

The development of lovingkindness (metta bhavana) works directly on our emotional habits, helping us to become more emotionally positive. You'll learn to be kinder to yourself: more patient, more understanding. You'll find that you're more considerate to others and that it's easier to forgive. You may even find (as others have) that others around you mysteriously become easier to be around. Hmmm.. wonder why that is?

Walking meditation

Walking meditation is a great way to bring more meditation into your daily life; it's a practice that can be done even in a busy city street. In this form of practice we develop greater mindfulness of the body, but we also become more aware of our thought patterns, our emotions, and even of the outside world. It's a calming practice. Walking meditation can also be a lovingkindness practice, especially when you're walking in a public place.

Mantra meditation

Our mantra meditation section is the most popular destination for our visitors. Mantras are simply phrases that we repeat (usually internally, but they can also be chanted out loud). As well as occupying the mind and thus calming it by preventing it from getting up to the usual mischief that causes us pain, mantras also have a symbolic value that evokes spiritual qualities, such as compassion, courage, and wisdom.

The Six Element Practice

The six element practice is a profound reflection on interconnectedness and impermanence. It's a very beautiful form of meditation. It not only helps us to calm the mind and give us a reassuring sense of our place in the great scheme of things, but it can be unsettling and challenging as well. Yes, I know. Reassuring and unsettling. That's Buddhist practice for you!

31 Comments. Leave new

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Love machine
June 7, 2008 9:23 am

I love you all

The guide would have saved me a lot of time had it been available when I started out. Thank you for the work you have done here.
Lars

it is very helpfull for the students and peoples in oll over the world

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The Rebel Mind » Taking The Red Pill: The First Step towards The Rebel Mindset
September 11, 2008 1:33 pm

[…] Learn to meditate, so you can free your mind. Good guides to learn meditation can be found here and […]

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About the meditation practices you can learn on Wildmind - The WebZappr
October 29, 2008 7:36 am

[…] the meditation practices you can learn on Wildmind clipped by: brightlight4 Clip Source: http://www.wildmind.org About the meditation practices you can learn on Wildmind If you don’t already have a […]

Thanks very much for this page and all your efforts to help us learn meditation, it is helping me big time in my daily life. I wish you all the best.

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10 Ways to Train Your Brain for Free or Cheap — MindTWEAKS
January 27, 2009 12:46 am

[…] Studies seem to show that this sort of meditation actually, really, changes the brain.  WildMind.org is a great resource with a huge free […]

This is a wonderful site. I have decided to teach a guided meditation class at my counseling practice and this site will help me give my students so many tools. I’VE learned so much already. Thank you!

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De-Stressing Your Brain: A Meditation Primer «
July 30, 2009 6:47 pm

[…] instruction, WildMind.org offers an excellent series of free  courses online (the full listing is here… I’d start at the posture workshop, then work your way down the page) as well as online […]

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Debraj Mallick
February 10, 2010 2:26 pm

Meditation is the only way. Through this a person can change this world.

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Mindfulness is:
March 7, 2010 6:46 am

[…] also Wildmind.com for further reading on Mindfulness. Mindfulness involves an attitude of acceptance, which is the […]

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How to Gain Clarity in Your Life
April 23, 2010 9:10 am

[…] ready to take the plunge, there are plenty of online courses available, such as those offered by Wildmind. It is also usually possible to find a local meditation centre offering guided evening […]

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How to Gain Clarity in Your Life « You're Right…
April 23, 2010 12:19 pm

[…] The Goenka courses are excellent in the sense that they force you to meditate – there are quite literally no distractions, and one is forced to face up to the many obvious – and subtle – ways in which we try to avoid a practice which is so alien to our restless mind and which forces us to face some uncomfortable realities. But for those not quite ready to take the plunge, there are plenty of online courses available, such as those offered by Wildmind […]

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Vibrant & Healthy Living: Tips for Brain Fitness & Healthy Aging » Blog Archive » De-Stressing Your Brain: A Meditation Primer
July 1, 2010 5:45 pm

[…] instruction, WildMind.org offers an excellent series of free courses online (the full listing is here… I’d start at the posture workshop, then work your way down the page) as well as online […]

Thank you for answering my many questions about the 8 fold path

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A few easy steps to meditate | Quick Questions & Quick Answers
February 16, 2011 11:26 am

[…] Wild Mind Websitehttp://www.wildmind.org/meditation […]

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mindfulness and kindness (hopper) « in2uract
May 30, 2011 10:54 am

[…] has mindfulness and lovingkindness meditation guides. Book Plus CDs/Tapes […]

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The Fifth Room Meditation Group
October 9, 2011 4:55 am

Keep up all your good work.

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How to boost body's immune system?
January 17, 2012 1:30 am

[…] Wildmindhttp://www.wildmind.org/meditation […]

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Meditation « urlifeclarity
January 7, 2013 1:41 am

[…] ready to take the plunge, there are plenty of online courses available, such as those offered by Wildmind. It is also usually possible to find a local meditation centre offering guided evening […]

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Words To Live By: Clarity | One Web Strategy
February 28, 2013 9:50 am

[…] ready to take the plunge, there are plenty of online courses available, such as those offered by Wildmind. It is also usually possible to find a local meditation centre offering guided evening […]

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What are the best websites for learning meditation techniques? | Meditation Resources
April 15, 2013 12:58 pm

Dear Bodhipaksha, I am deaf but I can read. kindly give me step by step loving meditation instructions that you have made in the audio. I will read, take notes and remember and practice this meditation. thanks. Ranganatha from India.

Having a transcription would be a good idea. I’ll give that some thought, Ranganatha. Thanks for the suggestion.

I have been reading Trungpa’s Cutting through Spiritual Materialism, and I find it very challenging. One thing that has confused me is the idea to give up “the watcher.” I am confused perhaps because of semantics, but my practice for years has been to try to “watch” my thoughts (or breath) during practice. What I think Trungpa means is a propensity for constant self-judgment, which I have. When I attempt to suspend this and quiet it (at those times I am aware of this tendency), the result is indeed spaciousness and clarity without bliss and without depression (at times…). I would appreciate your thoughts on my confusion as I try to deepen practice. Thank you.

I haven’t read the book, I’m afraid, so I don’t know what Trungpa meant by giving up “the watcher.”

Thank you anyway. I read a lot; Hindrance of Doubt was helpful.

I have been meditating for many years and found your article on some of the sensations helpful. I generally feel very much at peace but have noticed over the past 3 years or so that ‘vexatious’ people or whom I call ‘unquiet spirits’ have been seeking friendship with me and wondered why this was so. I tried to help them find the same peace I had in my life and wondered if that was what was attracting them. After short periods of ‘friendship’ I found they were upsetting the balance in my life and had to let them go. Is there a meditation you can recommend to provide protection from these ‘unquiet spirits’ seeking one out and attaching themselves to one. I do not want any more of these pseudo friends in my life who sap my energy and take me down to their frequencies so that I have to rebalance to find peace again.

Hi, Robyn.

I don’t think there’s any one meditation for this. Metta (especially self-metta) helps us recognize that our own need for happiness is important. If we really look into compassion practice deeply we see that we need to avoid the “idiot compassion” that allows people to walk over us. Upekkha bhavana helps us to recognize that we can’t “save” anyone (just in case you’re sending out signals saying “Let me save you”).

Namo Buddhaye, Master.

I want to ask a question which always floats in my mind..
That we all know that Resp. Buddha was so bold to give his points on all matters. And we know that Buddha never commented on God concept. So my ques is tht if Buddha easily n boldly makes his points clear then if he denies gods existence then he may claim clearly that god doesnt exist… so i am confused if he denies god or he knows tht there is no god thn why he spends his whole life spirtualy as an ascetic. Why he not said no need to renounce anything there is no supereme power. Is there anything like God exists who we can say is there.

Why did the Buddha not say there’s no need to renounce anything if there is no supreme power? Because the Buddhadharma is about ending our suffering. The causes of suffering reside in the mind, and the way it operates, and have nothing to do with a supreme being. In order to liberate ourselves from suffering we need to let go of clinging, and one thing that can be helpful is to live very simply, by renouncing family life and embracing a monastic lifestyle. I’m no monk, but when I’ve been on retreat and lived a quasi-monastic lifestyle, the point of this “asceticism” was not to create suffering for myself, but to create the simplicity and stillness that allow for intense observation of the mind and for the joy of simplicity to emerge.