wildmind buddhist meditation


Guided Meditations

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We have a selection of guided meditation CDs and MP3s in our online store.


Online Courses

Wildmind offers a range of online courses on meditation, practice in daily life, and Buddhism.

Starting Aug 6, 2007:

Meditation Courses

 The Path of Mindfulness and Love (4 weeks)
 Change Your Mind (4 weeks)
 Awakening the Heart (4 weeks)
 Entering the Path of Insight (4 weeks)


A student writes:

"I especially valued the very personalized comments and suggestions from Sunada, something I could not get from books or recordings, and possibly not even from a face-to-face class, where questions and responses need to be matched to the group."

- Julie, UK

Welcome to Wildmind's monthly meditation newsletter for August 2007. You're receiving this email because you subscribed to our newsletter mailing list. At Wildmind, we don't send unsolicited emails. If you think you've received this email in error or do not wish to receive future emails from us, you may unsubscribe at any time. Simply scroll to the end of this email and follow the instructions. You're welcome to take a look at our Privacy Policy.

July Online Classes Now Registering

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Learn meditation or study Buddhism online! Wildmind offers four-week courses suitable for complete beginners to experienced practitioners. You'll work directly with an experienced teacher who provides you personalized, one-on-one feedback. All of our courses offer a content-rich, interactive experience -- with online readings, guided meditations in MP3 format, and a discussion forum -- all available 24/7.

See details of our August courses on left sidebar, or...

Learn more about online courses

August 2007 Issue
The Psychology of Meditation

  • Quote of the Month: Dr. Lorne Ladner, PhD.
  • Book review: "Buddhist Psychology," by Geshe Tashi Tsering
  • A student asks: Sunada responds
  • Book Review: "Minding What Matters: Psychotherapy and the Buddha Within," by Robert Langan
  • Meditation in the News: Top 5 Stories From Last Month

Quote of the Month

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"When we ask what makes a happy and meaningful life, one problem that can arise is the tendency to respond with an answer that doesn’t really come from the heart."
- Dr. Lorne Ladner, PhD.

In this month's commentary, Bodhipaksa discusses how we can develop inner harmony. 

Read more

Book Review

book cover

"Buddhist Psychology," by Geshe Tashi Tsering. (Wisdom Publications, 2006. Paperback, $14.95)

Saccanama tells us that this book provides a light, accessible and illuminating guide to Buddhist psychological theory and its practical applications.  

Read more

A student asks...

book cover

"My sit didn’t go well today. I was really distracted, and couldn’t get rid of my thoughts. What am I doing wrong?"

Sunada discusses the inescapability of distracting thoughts and the problems we create when we judge our meditation practice.

Read more

Book Review

book cover

"Minding What Matters," by Robert Langan. (Wisdom Publications, 2006. Paperback, $14.95)

Nagaraja is bothered, bewildered, but not bewitched by Langan's unconventional take on Buddhist Psychotherapy.

Read more

Meditation in the News:
Top Five Stories of Last Month

meditation in the news

For a complete, categorized, and searchable listing of news stories concerning meditation, visit our news database.


Top researchers criticize new meditation and health study: A growing number of researchers believe that a study (see story below) claiming meditation does not improve health, is methodologically flawed, incomplete, and should be retracted.

Better studies needed to test meditation: There is a lack of rigorous clinical trials proving whether meditation has health benefits, according to Canadian researchers.

Meditators' brains seem alert: People who meditate show signs they are surprisingly alert, the first study of its kind has found.

How to succeed in business: Meditate: With hellish hours and info overload now the norm, the CEOs are turning to meditation to cope.

Lou finds the rhythm of life: Drink, drugs and rock'n'roll used to be the staples of rock's hard man Lou Reed. Now he says his perfect day involves meditation and lots of t’ai chi.