Wildmind Buddhist Meditation

Meditation Posture

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Meditating while kneeling, using a cushion or stool

If you can’t sit cross-legged in comfort, there are still many meditation postures open to you. You can sit in chair but many people find it’s not as satisfying as sitting on the floor.

Strange but true: somehow, being on the floor gives a more “grounded” feeling that makes it easier to calm the mind. All the same, I’ve often had to sit on a chair for various reasons and you do get used to it.

The most common alternative to a cross-legged meditation posture is to kneel, having the weight of the body supported on cushions or a meditation bench.

Finding good cushions is important. They need to be really firm, and most pillows just compress too much and can’t give you enough support.

The same goes for most ordinary, household cushions, which tend to compress too much. However, I have a lovely buckwheat pillow that is perfect when I turn it on end.

This meditator is using cushions (called zafus), that are specially designed for meditation. He’s kneeling with them between his legs, although cushions can of course be used for sitting cross-legged as well. Most people who sit astride cushions need two or three, depending on the height required.

The important thing is to get the right height. If you sit too low, you’ll end up slumping. Slumping interferes with your ability to stay aware, and can lead to discomfort.

If you sit too high, then you will have too much of a hollow in your back, which can lead to pinching. When your back is relatively upright, without you having to use any effort to keep it that way, then you’ve got the height about right.

Although the meditator above has his hands resting on his thighs, I recommend having your hands supported in front of you (see hands section). You can either have another cushion in front of you to rest your hands on, or you can tie something round your waist and rest your hands on that. I’ve often used a sweater with the arms tied behind my back. If you arrange the sweater carefully, you can make a little “nest” for your hands to rest on.

More meditation posture tech-talk

A blanket can also be used to provide support for your hands. Tie the blanket fairly tightly round your waist so that it covers your legs (also keeping your legs warm). Then arrange the blanket so that it provides a little “ledge” that you can rest your hands on, or tuck your hands inside it. A double (full) sized blanket is ideal. Blankets for a single (twin) bed tend to be a bit too small to tie properly around the waist, especially if you yourself are “full” sized.

Meditation benches are very useful. You can buy one, have one made, or make one yourself. We have a design for a simple bench that you can download (you’ll need the free Adobe Acrobat Reader).

Some meditation benches have rounded ends on the legs, so that it adjusts to the right angle as you sit on it. Others are at a set angle, which is great if you know exactly what height and angle you need your bench to be cut to. It took me several attempts to get a bench that suited me, and experienced a lot of uncomfortable meditations on intensive retreats before I hit on the right combination.

(An aside about terminology: my editor at Windhorse Publications pointed out that a bench is a long seat for more than one person, while a stool is a low seat, usually for a single occupant. So really they’re meditation stools, and not meditation benches. But if you try to correct every meditator who refers to their stool as a bench you may well have a sad and lonely existence.)

We offer a selection of meditation mats, cushions, and meditation stools in our online store.

Comments

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Comment from Dattaram Gangurde
Time: August 21, 2007, 6:23 am

Give me more information on meditating while kneeling while using a cushoin

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Comment from Bodhipaksa
Time: August 21, 2007, 6:32 am

If you have a specific question I’ll be happy to offer an answer.

All the best,
Bodhipaksa
PS. Whatever happened to saying “please”?

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Comment from Martha
Time: August 25, 2007, 9:03 am

Thank you for the useful tips. I also would like to know more about the effects of meditating from the stool seated, legs behind position — the only one I seem to be able to take. I wonder what is lost by taking this position and if there are other special concerns, beyond watching the spinal alignment. I wonder if the full effects of meditation can be achieved in this posture. Any further advice would be very much appreciated. Many thanks.

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Comment from Bodhipaksa
Time: August 25, 2007, 10:45 am

Hi Martha,

Kneeling on a stool is also how I meditate, and it’s been my experience that “the full effects of meditation” can certain be experienced sitting this way. There’s a bit of an unjustified mystique about the advantages of sitting cross-legged that I think is overblown.

There’s a lot you can watch out for including your butt, ankles, knees, and shoulders.

If you’re sitting regularly or for long periods you’ll need some kind of padding for your butt. For short sits a folded scarf will work fine, but if you’re on retreat you’ll probably need some kind of thin cushion. This of course changes the height, so an adjustable stool is very, very valuable. There’s a link to an online store selling these on page 2 of this article.

Knees: well, you just need to make sure you have good padding. A zabuton is ideal, although a folded blanked can work fine.

Ankles: this is mainly a problem when first getting used to kneeling, where the ankles may be uncomfortably stretched. A rolled-up blanket under the ankles can give support.

And shoulders: this actually goes back to the hands, which have to be supported so as not to put strain on the shoulders and on the muscles between the shoulder blades. If you’ve ever experienced painful knots forming on either side of the spine between the shoulder blades this is due to the hands not being supported. I find that in cold weather a blanket tied around the waist (even as high as or higher than the navel) provides something to tuck the hands into. In warmer weather a long scarf does the same job without making your legs overheat.

But there’s no question of this posture somehow inhibiting your ability to meditate.

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Comment from Sara Alvarez
Time: February 21, 2008, 12:07 pm

Hello:

I began manufacturing a kneeling stool with my husband, that you can see at my web page http://www.kneelingstool.com. The price is $55 plus shipping by mail. It is very comfortable. I been using it and recommend it. The page is in spanish.

Thanks.

Sara

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Comment from Matthew Searle
Time: April 7, 2008, 12:35 pm

Hello,

I have just started using a stool which does give me a very upright and secure posture, but when using it, my stomach muscles feel constantly clentched which affects my breathing. Is this indicitive of an incorrect posture or is just due to the fact that i’m not used to sitting in that postition?

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Comment from Bodhipaksa
Time: April 7, 2008, 5:16 pm

Hi Matthew,

Posture is one area where it can be hard to make suggestions online. Without actually seeing your posture I’m left guessing what may be going on, but it does sound as if the stool is not actually providing you adequate support. It may be that the angle of the stool is wrong, and that you’re having to use the abdominal muscles in order to maintain an upright posture. I suppose the question I should ask is, what happens when you stop clenching those muscles? What does the rest of your body (especially your back) do?

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Comment from Maria
Time: May 30, 2008, 5:43 pm

Hello,

My husband has graciously agreed to make a meditation stool for me. I thought I had saved a copy of your simple design (linked above), but I can’t find it on my hard drive, and the link above does not work. Would it be possible for you to make the plan available again?

Many thanks, and Namaste.

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Comment from Bodhipaksa
Time: May 30, 2008, 6:21 pm

Hi Maria,

Sorry about that — we’ve made a few changes to the site recently and the link got broken. It’s now fixed however.

In the end I found that particular stool to be a bit small for me, but I’m 6′ tall — it may be that it’s a good height for you.

I must add drafting a new stool plan to my ever-increasing list of things to do!

All the best,
Bodhipaksa

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Comment from Maria
Time: May 30, 2008, 6:42 pm

Thank you for fixiing the link. I am over 5’10”, so we’ll take that into consideration when my husband makes the stool.

I am grateful.

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Comment from Ross
Time: June 28, 2008, 1:55 pm

I am learning a martial art in which we start the class with a Buddhist meditation. It is this kneeling meditaion, however we use no support (no stool, cusions; nothing). Do you think this unwise? Also, I am unsure of the best way to have my feet (sitting directly on my heels, toes pointed backwards; the same but with toes curled under – can’t explain it any better; or heels either side of me). It is perhaps whatever is most comfortable for me, but I would appreciate some insight from you. Thank you.

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Comment from Bodhipaksa
Time: June 28, 2008, 8:00 pm

Hi Ross,

Martial arts are rather outside my field of expertise, but according to this Aikido site one way to sit is with the toes straight back (not curled under) and the big toes crossed. But it appears that traditions vary, so this is really a question for your sensei.

As for whether it’s a good idea to sit this way, I can imagine it could be very uncomfortable to do this for long periods (and even for short periods when you’re not used to it) but it shouldn’t be harmful, especially if you build up gradually. You can expect your knees and the tops of your feet to hurt, and possible the ankles as well, until they get used to the stretch. And your lower legs may well go to sleep. I’d suggest you practice at home on a somewhat softer surface in order to get used to the pressure.

All the best,
Bodhipaksa

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Comment from Kyle Rogers
Time: October 21, 2008, 2:29 pm

found your site through google, and i’m glad i did. I decided to try meditation to help motivate myself into a more disciplined morning ritual (morning as in, when i wake up…. sometimes afternoon)
First off, i found that in the chair attempt my back was sore after 5 minutes. This is prolly because it is a horrible chair, i then decided to try the kneeling position. This is what i came up with for a set-up:
I used a camping insulation mat for on the floor. it’s a thin foam roll out pad. I live in new england and my tile floor gets quite cold in the fall before the heat goes on.
i dont’ own any cushions that would be firm enough to support my slightly heavier than average wieght. however i found that when i took a laundry sack (kinda like a big pillow case) and i put 2 wool blankets 1 pair of jeans 1 pair of khakis and 2 shirts in there it provided exceptional support and allowed my knees to stop hurting.
as for hand support (i’m 6’1”) i put my hoodie on that has one of those large pockets in the front (kinda like a kangaroo pouch) and i found restingmy hands in that to be most comfortable and warm.

this worked much better than i thought it would and as a first timer for meditating….. ever, i do have to say i’m going to do it daily now.

ok now that i shared my newbie experience with you all, question time.

my morning ritual i hope to get going will involve breakfast, workout, meditation, and tai chi. any advise on which order they should go in?

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Comment from Bodhipaksa
Time: October 21, 2008, 2:51 pm

Hi Kyle,

It sounds like you did a really good job of improvising using what was on hand. I admire your ingenuity!

I think you’d probably find that Tai Chi works well before meditation and that a workout is better done after meditation (it’s very stimulating). As for breakfast — maybe that depends on how long your tai chi and meditation are going to take, and how long you can go without eating!

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Comment from Tim
Time: November 6, 2008, 3:43 pm

Hi – I broke my ankle a couple of years ago and have had a difficult time finding a good sitting posture since then. Sitting cross-legged on a cushion bends the ankle upwards and is making the break point feel tender and sore throughout the day.

The best position I’ve been able to find is stretching the one leg out in front of me while sitting on a cushion with my back against a wall, but I find I’m not as alert as when I’m supporting my back myself. I was wondering if a bench might be a better solution, but I’m not sure about the pressure it would put on my knees and ankles, particularly during intensive retreats.

Thanks so much for offering your advice here!

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Comment from Ed McGuigan
Time: January 31, 2009, 4:20 pm

For any yoga practitioners out there, I found that I am very comfortable kneeling on my yoga mat folded 3-ply ( just long enough to kneel on ) and sitting on two stacked foam yoga blocks.

Just sitting on my heels did get quite uncomfortable but sitting on the blocks I have no discomfort even over 30 minutes. The blocks are arranged “crosswise” so that I can rest both “cheeks” on them.

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Comment from Ed McGuigan
Time: December 8, 2009, 2:26 pm

Update to my last post. I bought the meditation zabuton and zafu ( the flat sitting cushion with cotton batting and the cyclindrical cuschion filled with buckwheat hulls ). I find that I can kneel on the zabuton and place a yoga block under the zafu to allow a slightly elevated kneeling position that I can tolerate for 45 minutes with no discomfort. It’s probably similar to a high meditation bench but it seems a little more comfy.

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Comment from Bodhipaksa
Time: December 10, 2009, 10:52 pm

Hi Ed,

Sounds pretty much like the posture in the photograph above.

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Comment from Katie Honey
Time: April 19, 2010, 7:21 am

Dear Bodhipaksa,
Have been experimenting meditating by myself and in classes for several years now (and using your still the mind cds!) and am starting to be frustrated by posture problems… I find sitting crosslegged the most satisfying but I can’t get my knees to touch the ground and don’t want to force them, and my back seems to get sore. Have recently decided I’m not being sensible and am experimenting with kneeling but when using a bench I feel that if I released tension in the lower stomach and upper thighs I would fold over forwards! and this is in a position when the bench is tilted slightly forwards and my spine is straight and my head well aligned and my weight seems to be travelling downwards… Is this a common problem? Kneeling with cushions seems to give me a rounded back. I also never know what angle to have my knees at.
Thanks for the excellent CD.
Katie

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Comment from Bodhipaksa
Time: April 19, 2010, 9:29 am

Hi Katie,

It can be notoriously hard to “diagnose” long-distance, but it sounds like you’re on a stool that’s a bit too low. Normally that would make you slump, but if you’re holding yourself upright with your abdominal and leg muscles — using them to pull your pelvis upright — then you’d have that sense that if you relaxed your upper body would fall forward. I’d suggest trying to raise the height you’re sitting at by about a centimeter at a time, which might be most easily accomplished by putting something (perhaps a folded blanket or thin cushion) between your buttocks and the seat.

If that doesn’t work, I’d suggest email me a photo, taken from the side during meditation, showing what you look like normally and when you let go of your abdominal muscles and in the thighs.

I’m glad you’re enjoying the CD.

All the best,
Bodhipaksa

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Comment from Patricia
Time: November 11, 2010, 12:21 pm

Dear Bodhipaksa,
Your website it fantastic, so glad I found it, thank you!
I am 35 years old and after some failed attempts at starting to meditate I really wanted to try to make it a regular practice, However, I had surdery of my hip over 10 years ago. My hips fine now apart from being very stiff. Therefore, as I know postural alignment is crucial in meditating I wonder what would you advice as the best way for me to sit? I did buy a meditation stoll with a cusion but I’m not sure if that’s the best option.
Many Thanks for advice advice,
Kind Wishes,
Patricia

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Comment from Bodhipaksa
Time: November 11, 2010, 11:40 pm

Hi Patricia,

Thanks for your kind comments. It sounds like a kneeling bench is a good option for you. If that proves to be uncomfortable then a regular chair could be used.

All the best,
Bodhipaksa

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Comment from Joshua
Time: January 4, 2011, 9:17 pm

I began meditating on my own without much knowledge of proper posture etc. The information on this page has made me realize the cross-legged style of meditation is not suitable for me as I’m not quite flexible enough to do it properly and with comfort and alertness. I have tried the kneeling position and I feel it is the right position for me. I just got my first mala and wondered if you have any advice on proper hand positions for both the hand holding the mala and my other hand. I have chosen a Mantra from this site and am very excited to start mantra meditation. Do you have any pointers for someone who is just beginning to use a mantra in their meditation?

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Comment from Bodhipaksa
Time: January 4, 2011, 9:58 pm

Hi, Joshua.

There doesn’t seem to be any standard way of using a mala. Some people will tell you there is, but they’re probably just telling you about how people in their tradition use malas. Most often I see them used in the right hand, and that’s the hand I use. Often the beads will be draped over the middle to pinkie fingers (together) rather than over the index finger. The thumb is used to pull the beads one at a time (one per mantra) toward your body (although I believe some people also push the beads away, which I think must be very awkward). It seems appropriate to hold the mala up at the level of the heart. What to do with the other hand? I think it makes sense to let it rest in dhyana mudra, i.e. resting on your lap, Although if you’re on a kneeling bench you may not exactly have a lap, and you may need to support the hand on a cushion, or on a blanket wrapped around the legs, or have it tucked into a scarf tied around the waist.

All the best with your practice. I’d suggest you dedicate your mala before you continue practicing — basically just saying something to the effect of “May the practice done with this mala go to the alleviation of the suffering of all beings.” Sometimes people will get their malas blessed by a teacher, if they have a teacher, but I see that as an aid to devotion rather than as a necessary prerequisite for effective practice. It’s your intension and effort that’s important, not some words muttered by another person.

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Comment from Joshua
Time: January 4, 2011, 10:20 pm

Thank you so much for the quick reply! It was very helpful. I haven’t used my mala yet since I wasn’t quite sure on the proper way. I will dedicate it before I begin use. I live in Northern Idaho in a very small mountain town so this web site has been a blessing. Again Thank You!

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Comment from Bodhipaksa
Time: January 4, 2011, 10:29 pm

Hi Joshua,

You’re very welcome. When I set up this site I had people like you in mind.

I’d encourage you not to let fear of “doing it wrong” prevent you from practicing. If your intension is to “cease to do evil, learn to do good, purify the heart” (this is “Buddhism in a nutshell” — a verse from the Dhammapada) just plunge in! There’s no “Buddhist God” who is watching in order to punish your transgressions. Let go of fear, and practice with sincerity and kindness. Things will sort themselves out if you practice in this way.

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Comment from Aude-Noëlle
Time: May 3, 2011, 9:17 pm

Dear Bodhipaksa,

I love your site, glad I found it.
I have been meditating for about 5 weeks and really “enjoying” it, if such word can be used – it’s hard work, after all.
I have been using a stool that my husband got made by a sculptor in Senegal, according to his specs, from a single block of wood. It’s a great design, sort of mushroom-like, with a single foot (the base slightly at an angle for right posture), and a little seat-base, just enough for the “cheeks” to fit. I love it, it allows me to sit kneeling with feet each side of the stool foot. I could stay like that for ever.
But I decided to give the cushion a try, as I thought it would be easier to travel with a zafu than that wood stool. My experience after 2 times has been hard, legs falling asleep, my mind just gasping and grasping, tough 30 minutes.
So I wonder if there is any true benefit to using a cushion vs. a stool like mine. I feel that it’s going to take me a long time to get used to the crossed-legged posture, when all the while I could be progressing better in my meditation with that stool. For traveling, I’d have to use a chair: I read above that it’s not the best, but what’s my choice? I don’t want to carry that stool in a suitcase, it weighs, and I could lose it.
Just wondering about comments: I just saw a documentary on buddhist monks, and they all sit cross-legged, but probably have been doing so since… age 5 or 10!
Thank you!

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Comment from Bodhipaksa
Time: May 3, 2011, 10:21 pm

Hi there.

I sit on a stool: a two-legged “seiza bench” that allows me to kneel comfortably. I’ve been stiff since I was a young child, and even when I had a period of doing yoga daily for years, I never got to the point where I could sit comfortably cross-legged. I don’t actually see any good reason, at this point, to pursue sitting cross-legged. I have better things to do with my time and energy. The same may be true for yourself.

I use cushions when I have to, and I can do so comfortably, but I prefer my trusty stool since it’s very reliable (always at the same height and angle). It’s handy to be able to use cushions when my stool isn’t at hand; probably you’re uncomfortable because you’re sitting too low, and need to have more cushions. I’m just guessing, of course, since I haven’t seen you sitting.

For travel purposes, you might want to make or buy a seiza bench — especially one that folds for easier carrying. In our own store we have a very lightweight but comfortable two-part meditation bench. It only has one leg, but your own legs provide ample stability. We also have some two-legged versions as well. They’re a bit heavier, but they do feel very stable indeed. Of course ours isn’t the only store around, and there are plenty of other places where you can get hold of a meditation bench.

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Comment from Aude-Noëlle
Time: May 3, 2011, 11:52 pm

thank you for the prompt answer. You write “I don’t actually see any good reason, at this point, to pursue sitting cross-legged.” and that confirms that I don’t need to do it either. The comment about having better things to do with your time and energy hit home.

I’ll stick to my stool, and I’ll check out the pages suggested for a travel bench. That seems like an excellent idea.

thanks for this useful information, and I’m going to spend some time exploring your site.

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Comment from Bud
Time: June 18, 2011, 11:57 am

In the spirit of transparency, I think you should mention the
connection between Wildmind and Laughing Buddha benches that you are pushing here. Yes you mention others, and provide a DIY PDF, but you also clearly distinguish your benches – “I’d never take anything else on retreat with me.” Readers are more likely to go with your personal recommendation. Which is fine. But don’t make it sound like you are casually suggesting a bench – when it is tied to your interests.

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Comment from Bodhipaksa
Time: June 18, 2011, 12:03 pm

There is no financial connection between Wildmind and Laughing Buddha Trading, and we don’t benefit in any way by promoting the bench they sell. Thanks for allowing me to clarify that point.

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Comment from Caroline
Time: August 17, 2011, 9:40 am

On stools/benches, I just wanted to offer a personal recommendation of the ones here: http://www.joyiswithinyou.com/ .

Height varies according to which way round you put the bench (each leg is asymmetrical), with the curved legs offering variation of the angle. The padding is great and it’s sturdy yet incredibly lightweight.

I’m 5’4″ and ordered the medium-large, which works fine for me – I could probably have sized down one too, but it’s so adjustable that the size isn’t too important. It feels good to be off my chair and onto the floor, and without the nagging mid-back ache I always used to experience!

I paid for shipping to the UK but it’s free within the US. Worth it for me, as the adjustability meant it would hopefully be a no-brainer for mail order as there’s nowhere near to me to go and actually try benches out first.

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Comment from Greg
Time: August 23, 2011, 2:40 am

I’m unable to find any laughing buddha adjustable bench. In fact the only fully adjustable bench I’m able to find (by any brand really) is zenbench.com – looks like a really interesting design actually, but I was curious about the one you mention here. Could you provide a direct link to the actual bench on amazon, or somewhere else?

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Comment from Bodhipaksa
Time: August 23, 2011, 6:44 am

It may no longer be available.

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Comment from John
Time: February 21, 2012, 4:31 pm

I injured my tailbone (coccyx) last fall and have a lot of pain if I sit for more than a few minutes in anything other than a very upright position with all my weight on my sit bones. A padded chair or a zafu is intolerable while a hard seat with my back arched is best. But maintaining the position makes my back hurt. I am considering a meditation bench but hate to spend money on one without being able to try it out. Do you think this might help, or do I need to look at some other options (and what might those be)? Would a bench with rounded legs work better?

Thank you!

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Comment from Bodhipaksa
Time: February 21, 2012, 10:25 pm

Hi, John.

Really, there’s just no way to know whether your coccyx is going to be OK on a meditation bench without you trying one out. If you can’t try one at a local meditation center or meditation supplies store (and I recognize that those are few and far between) then see if you can find a place online that has a returns policy. If you want to try one from our own store, and it doesn’t work out, we’d be happy to take it back and give you a refund. You’d only be out for the shipping. The advantage of a bench with rounded legs is that it’s definitely going to be at the right angle. Usually on a bench that’s at the right angle and height, your weight does go through your sitting bones. I can imagine that if you don’t include any padding, you wouldn’t put pressure on the coccyx. I’m guessing that this was the problem with the zafu.

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Comment from Matic
Time: May 18, 2012, 11:43 am

Hello,

Today, after so many failed attempts in the past, I had the finest session a man can have. I had always been forcing myself into positions that did not suit me, my legs were in pain and usually they would fall asleep. But after reading through your site I have decided to use the seiza position with a stool. I have built one myself using your plans (we are of the same size) and I feel I must express my gratitude. Thank you! It is a great thing you are doing here, keep it up.

Matic

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Comment from Mark Walsh
Time: May 26, 2013, 9:07 am

Dear Bodhipaksa
I have recently been using a meditation stool following several months trying to sit cross legged only to give up due to ankle pain. I am finding the stool a great way to sit upright for longer however my ankles lying flat behind me leave me with pins and needles and eventually pain in the feet after only 10-15 minutes. I am trying to lean on my knees however the stool keeps my weight distributed along my legs. My ankles hurt so much that my meditation is cut short. Have you any instruction you can give me to allow my ankles to be pain free? I would value your advice.
With best wishes and thank you
Mark

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Comment from Bodhipaksa
Time: May 26, 2013, 9:47 am

You might want to try rolling up a thin towel and having it under your ankles, so that they’re not stretched so much.

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Comment from Mark Walsh
Time: May 27, 2013, 5:13 am

Hi Bodhipaksa,
Ok I will give that a try and see how I get on. Thank you for taking the time to reply.
With best wishes
Mark

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Comment from Alan James
Time: June 12, 2013, 10:33 pm

Great site! I have a meditation stool, and am wondering whether it is best to sit with the legs together under the stool, or out wide, straddling the stool. When kneeling with cushions, one has wide legs. Is this the way it should be even with a stool, or is it normal to have legs together when using a stool? I suppose stability would be worse with legs together. Thanks.

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Comment from Bodhipaksa
Time: June 13, 2013, 10:37 am

Assuming you’re talking about a bench with two legs (there are one-legged varieties) they’re intended to be used with your legs between the legs of the bench. Stability’s not usually an issue because the bench itself is very stable compared to a pile of cushions.

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Comment from Alan James
Time: June 13, 2013, 11:22 am

I see. I have a two-legged meditation stool, and it is far too high. That is why I am having trouble, I now see. I think I may order the Kindseat. I have never used one, so the concern might be that the automatic tilt makes one unstable from front to back. But on your other page you mention that this is really not the case. Is this because, although it tilts, it is very tense and has friction? Or because the dimensions of body and seat somehow result in stability on a moveable seat? Is it really adequately stable? I hope so, for it would be a great solution for me. Thank you very much for the info.

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Comment from Bodhipaksa
Time: June 13, 2013, 12:16 pm

The Kindseat is completely stable and doesn’t wobble at all. It responds to your body’s movements and adjusts with you as you move, but won’t move unless you do. And of course the height is adjustable, so you can tweak it until it’s just right for your body.

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Pingback from Anxiety and zazen | Zazen Every Day
Time: August 27, 2013, 4:24 am

[…] the morning. I slept badly due to pregnancy-related hip pain, so instead of sitting Burmese I sat kneeling which was much more […]

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Comment from Bill
Time: December 11, 2014, 1:42 pm

I have a problem I am working with but might have a struggle. I can’t do lotus position so got a stool which is adjustable. I notice you mentioned a cushion for the floor, are they thick enogh for me as I ruptured my acilles years ago and although I am doing aromatherapy and massage along with some lighy yoga stretches I find the tension can be a bit much . Would a couple of cushions help take the strain off .
? Thanks for the info. I am just starting to get a bit more applied to meditaion after a lapse.

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Comment from Bodhipaksa
Time: December 11, 2014, 2:30 pm

Zabutons (floor cushions for meditating) are pretty thick. I’ve no way of knowing whether they’d be enough to keep your legs comfortable, though.

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