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Bodhipaksa

Jun 03, 2013

“To believe in the heroic makes heroes” Benjamin Disraeli

Benjamin_Disraeli_by_Cornelius_Jabez_Hughes,_1878In the Path of Freedom, a 1st century meditation manual that I’ve mentioned a few times because it’s the earliest source I know of for the cultivation of lovingkindness etc. in stages, we’re asked first of all to connect with mudita (appreciation) in the following way:

When one sees or hears that some person’s qualities are esteemed by others, and that he is at peace and is joyful, one thinks thus: “Sadhu! Sadhu! May he continue joyful for a long time!”

So this brings up the question of who we know (or know of) who is like that. And it also brings up the question of whether we actually want there to be people …

Bodhipaksa

Jun 02, 2013

Cultivating appreciative joy (Day 51)

100 Days of LovingkindnessThe third of the Brahmaviharas, or “immeasurables,” after lovingkindness and compassion, is muditā. Muditā is sometimes translated as sympathetic joy, or empathetic joy, or as appreciative joy.

Our old friend, the first century text, the Path to Freedom, describes it like this:

As parents, who, on seeing the happiness of their dear and only child are glad, and say, “sadhu!” so, one develops appreciative joy for all beings. Thus should appreciative joy be known. The undisturbed dwelling of the mind in appreciative joy — this is called the practising of it. Gladness is its salient characteristic. Non-fear is its function. Destruction of dislike is its manifestation. Its benefits are equal to

Bodhipaksa

Jun 01, 2013

The pursuit of happiness (Day 50)

100 Days of LovingkindnessWe all want happiness, but much joy do you experience in your life? And I mean real “heart welling up,” “spring in the step,” “full of the joys of spring joy,” “happy for no reason” joy, rather than the dull sense of pleasure that we often experience.

Most people, when they’re asked this question, will say “not much.” Many may go entire days, or even weeks, without any significant joy. Life can often seem like an endless round of chasing deadlines and striving to stay on top of an ever-growing to-do list, and so be imbued with a sense of stress.

Do we even expect to be happy? It strikes …

Rick Hanson PhD

Dec 15, 2012

When you feel like you’re “not enough”

Girls hands holding ripe blueberriesOne slice of the pie of life feels relaxed and contented. And then there is that other slice, in which we feel driven and stressed. Trying to get pleasures, avoid pains, pile up accomplishments and recognitions, be loved by more people. Lose more weight, try to fill the hole in the heart. Slake the thirst, satisfy the hunger. Strive, strain, press.

This other slice is the conventional strategy for happiness. We pursue it for four reasons.

  • The brain evolved through its reptilian, mammalian, and primate/human stages to meet three needs: avoid harms, approach rewards, and attach to others. In terms of these three needs, animals that were nervous, driven, and
  • Rick Hanson PhD

    Oct 15, 2012

    Mindfulness of good intentions

    Hustling through an airport, I stopped to buy some water. At the shop’s refrigerator, a man was bent over, loading bottles into it. I reached past him and pulled out one he’d put in. He looked up, stopped working, got a bottle from another shelf, and held it out to me, saying “This one is cold.” I said thanks and took the one he offered.

    He didn’t know me and would never see me again. His job was stocking, not customer service. He was busy and looked tired. But he took the time to register that I’d gotten a warm bottle, and he cared enough to shift gears and get me …

    Rick Hanson PhD

    Aug 20, 2012

    Seek out the good news

    “Tell the truth.” It’s the foundation of science, ethics, and relationships.

    But we have a brain that evolved to tell lies to help us survive. As I’ve written before, over several hundred million years our ancestors:

    • Had to avoid two kinds of mistakes: thinking there’s a tiger in the bushes but actually all is well, and thinking all is well but actually there is a tiger about to pounce. The cost of the first mistake is needless worry while the cost of the second one is no more gene copies. Mother Nature designed us to make the first mistake a thousand times to avoid making the second mistake even once.
    • Had to get

    Rick Hanson PhD

    Jun 26, 2012

    Relax, you’ve arrived

    We spend so much of our time trying to get somewhere.

    Part of this comes from our biological nature. To survive, animals – including us – have to be goal-directed, leaning into the future.

    It’s certainly healthy to pursue wholesome aims, like paying the rent on time, raising children well, healing old pain, or improving education.

    But it’s also important to see how this focus on the future – on endless striving, on getting the next task done, on climbing the next mountain – can get confused and stressful.

    It’s confused because the brain:

    • Overestimates both the pleasure of future gains and the pain of future losses. (This evolved to motivate our ancient ancestors to

    Bodhipaksa

    Mar 27, 2012

    “As a parent raises a child with deep love, care for water and rice as though they were your own children.” Dogen

    So I was walking to the office the other day, when something rather lovely happened.

    Before I say what that was, I have to explain that walking to the office is a new thing for me — or the rediscovery of an old thing. Now before I entered a spell of working from home, I often used to make my morning “walking commute” into a walking meditation. Then, for several years, I did almost all of my work out of the house, and my daily walking meditation died away. But a couple of months ago I rented an office in town, only a 15 minute walk away, and I’m getting back …

    Rick Hanson PhD

    Mar 12, 2012

    How to appreciate and receive life’s gifts

    Life gives to each one of us in so many ways.

    For starters, there’s the bounty of the senses – including chocolate chip cookies, jasmine, sunsets, wind singing through pine trees, and just getting your back scratched.

    What does life give you?

    Consider the kindness of friends and family, made more tangible during a holiday season, but of course continuing throughout the year.

    Or the giving of the people whose hard work is bound up in a single cup of coffee. Or all those people in days past who figured out how to make a stone ax – or a fire, edible grain, loom, vaccine, or computer. Or wrote plays …

    Bodhipaksa

    Jan 14, 2012

    Five ways to increase your joy

    Joy (sukha in Pali) should be our natural state of being. Unfortunately, though, we’ve been brought up in a society that emphasizes wanting things and having things as the primary path to happiness. Wanting things actually destroys joy, while having things brings only a short-term burst of pleasure that fades quickly.

    In fact, thinking that joy depends on things outside of ourselves is a trap. It makes it harder for us to experience real happiness. True happiness comes from our attitude toward things, not from things themselves.

    Despite its seeming elusiveness, it’s possible for us to spend much of our time in a state of joy, and here are …