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You are browsing all posts tagged with the topic: Australia

Wildmind Meditation News

Mar 25, 2013

Professor Ellen Langer on Leadership and Mindfulness at the ADC Future Summit…

Ellen Langer, Yale PhD, is a Harvard Professor of Psychology. Among other honors, she is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship and three Distinguished Scientist Awards, the World Congress Award, the NYU Alumni Achievement Award, and the Staats award for Unifying Psychology, and has authored eleven books and over 200 research articles on the illusion of control, perceived control, successful aging, decision-making, to name a few of the topics. Each of these is examined through the lens of her theory of mindfulness. Her research has demonstrated that by actively noticing new things—the essence of mindfulness—health, well being, and competence follow. Her best selling books include Mindfulness; The Power of Mindful Learning; On Becoming an Artist: …

Wildmind Meditation News

Nov 26, 2012

Zen and the art of switching off

Nina Karnikowski escapes the frenzied pace of her everyday life with a meditation, yoga and detox retreat in the hills of Bali.

I’m a chronic multitasker. A restless sleeper. A compulsive mental to-do list compiler. A neurotic over-analyser. Put simply: my head is an exhausting place to be.

People have often told me meditation could help me shush things up top, and I have tried it a couple of times. There was that session a girlfriend convinced me to attend 10 years ago because “the monk running it is so hot” (he was), and those couple of Buddhist meditation classes I did half-heartedly last …

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Wildmind Meditation News

Oct 18, 2012

The sound of silence

Sarah Berry, The Age (Australia): What’s the point of being completely silent for three days? You could just be drinking cocktails by the pool.

“You’re doing this for fun?” confused friends ask before I leave. After spending three days in ‘noble silence’ and meditating for 11 hours a day, several people with me on the silent retreat are asking the same question.

At the end of the final day, when the silence is finally broken, one woman admits she spent a fair bit of the time wondering why she hadn’t just “booked into a resort and spent the weekend by the pool, sipping cocktails …

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Wildmind Meditation News

Oct 02, 2012

Buddhist monks promote inner peace

Lachlan Thompson, Daily Examiner: It was a weekend to reflect and seek inner peace for the parents and children involved in a two-day workshop with the Gyuto Tibetan Buddhist monks in Yamba at the weekend.

“It was fabulous, especially the final evening where the monks performed their famous chanting,” said event organiser Amanda Brightwell.

The monks closed the two-day workshop with their famous Mantra Magic Chant where they use ancient Tibetan mantras to harmonise and create a soothing, meditation tone.

Other events at the workshop included classes on meditation and dealing with depression as well as symbolic craft activities for children. The monks …

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Wildmind Meditation News

May 11, 2012

Study highlights links between meditation and health

A new study from the University of Sydney is the latest to highlight possible links between meditation and improved mental and physical health.

Rsearchers surveyed 343 long-term Sahaja yoga meditation practitioners and compared their results to the general population.

“We found that the health and wellbeing profile of people who had meditated for at least two years was significantly higher in the majority of health and wellbeing categories when compared to the Australian population,” Sydney Morning Herald quoted research leader Dr Ramesh Manocha, from the university’s psychiatry discipline.

The study highlighted Sahaja yoga meditation as it focuses on achieving “mental silence”, the closest practice to the “log” definition which was found by the researchers in old texts.

Dr Manocha asserted that the study …

Wildmind Meditation News

Sep 08, 2011

Zen and the art of keeping kids still

Elissa Doherty, Herald Sun: Meditate on this: a Melbourne childcare centre seems to have found a way to keep squirming toddlers still.

There are no “ommms”, but there were a few “umms?” when Kensington Community Children’s Co-Operative introduced meditation and yoga classes.

It is one of a handful of centres in Victoria turning to ancient techniques to help modern children relax.

The lights go out and children as young as three channel their inner zen while listening to world music in a twist on traditional meditation.

If they get too antsy, they could read a book, draw, or spend individual time with…

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Wildmind Meditation News

Apr 02, 2011

Researchers to investigate stress response in regular meditators

While most people are aware that meditation can help us to relax, a group of University of South Australia researchers hope to prove that a daily dose of meditation can do much more.

They have begun a research project investigating stress responses in people who meditate regularly compared to people who are long-term carers and who do not meditate.

Behavioural neuroscience researcher Dr Maarten Immink says ultimately the project aims to show that meditation reduces stress and that it can have physical as well as mental function benefits for people who live in higher stress situations.

“Previous research has already shown that meditation helps with attention, memory and decision making,” he says.

“The general notion of meditation is not to avoid stress but to …

Wildmind Meditation News

Mar 18, 2011

Kids urged to meditate

Children should meditate, not watch TV.

Dance teacher Nicola Baartse has started the stretch and meditate class for children, five and above.

Recent studies found too much television early in life had adverse affects on education and health. “As a mum, I am passionate about having my kids find a way to destress and learn how to be still sometimes without using the TV as a relaxation device,” she said.

“It helps to slow them down and give them a chance to recuperate after a hectic day.”

The class involves mind-body movement meditation. “We structure the movement with things the children are familiar with like animals and places they’ve been,” Ms Baartse said.

The dance teacher, who runs Oasis Movement Academy, said there was …

Wildmind Meditation News

Mar 16, 2011

Learning to live in the moment

A few boys twitch and are reluctant to close their eyes. It’s not easy to get those aged 10 to 12 to keep still, let alone stop their minds from racing.

But it doesn’t take long before the soothing words of meditation teacher Janet Etty-Leal have lulled this class of grade 5 and 6 students into a different mental space.

Lying in a circle, they are practising a form of meditation known as mindfulness that has become core curriculum at Yarraman Oaks Primary School. This school in Noble Park is one of a growing number that have embraced the technique to improve focus and stress management.

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Principal Bill Liston was so taken with mindfulness after attending sessions by Ms Etty-Leal …

Wildmind Meditation News

Jan 11, 2011

Children need more meditation and less stimulation

A remote diocese in Australia is leading the way by allowing regular periods of silent meditation in the classroom

If you want your children to feel more relaxed and less stressed, give them silence, not iPods.

This unthinkable idea came to mind after listening to Ernie Christie and Dr Cathy Day, two educationists from Queensland, Australia. They were addressing an audience at Regent’s College, London, on the benefits of allowing children to experience regular periods of silent meditation in the classroom.

A pilot study in 2005, involving teaching meditation to five- to 17-year-olds, had shown that children are not only capable of meditation, they actually enjoy it. The benefits to children’s wellbeing were so obvious to teachers that it persuaded Cathy Day, director …