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Wildmind Meditation News

Oct 08, 2013

Buddhism, a religion or not?

Merlyn Seeley, examiner.com: It is one of the debates that has been around for decades, maybe longer. Sometimes it rears its ugly head and other times it lies dormant waiting on it’s next moment to shine. Referring to the debate of whether Buddhism is a religion or not, we take a look at recent news articles. According to the Gaurdian, in an article dated October 7, Michael McGhee, a renowned Gaurdian.com philosopher, talks about his views as to whether or not Buddhism should be referred to as a religion or a spiritual practice.

Although, I do not know if McGhee is a Buddhist or not…

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Bodhipaksa

Sep 17, 2013

Buddhists and violence

Aaron AlexisIt’s been reported that Aaron Alexis, the former U.S. Navy reservist who went on a shooting spree on a naval base, leaving 13 people dead, including him, was a Buddhist.

This isn’t of course the first time a Buddhist has acted violently. While Buddhism generally has a peaceful history, Buddhist institutions have persecuted non-Buddhists and those from other Buddhist traditions and have sometimes supported war (Japan in the Second World War is a notable example). And Buddhist individuals have committed pretty much every violent act you can imagine, for their own personal reasons, whether that’s greed, hatred, or, in Alexis’ case apparently, mental illness.

Is it possible, in the face of all this, …

Wildmind Meditation News

Sep 11, 2013

McMindfulness revisited

Dr. Arnie Kozak, Beliefnet: I have read Ron Purser and David Loy’s Huffington Post blog entry, Beyond McMindfulness. They write a thoughtful indictment of the popularization of all things mindfulness, especially in the corporate context. There are many important points made in this essay:

Uncoupling mindfulness from its ethical and religious Buddhist context is understandable as an expedient move to make such training a viable product on the open market. But the rush to secularize and commodify mindfulness into a marketable technique may be leading to an unfortunate denaturing of this ancient practice, which was intended for far more than…

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Wildmind Meditation News

Aug 17, 2013

Why I observed Ramadan as an aspiring Muslim/Buddhist Jew

GOOD: I recently spent two months living in Ibri, Oman, learning Arabic. I was there as part of the Critical Language Scholarship (CLS) program run by the U.S. State department. Having just graduated from college, this seemed like the perfect reason to postpone the job search and flee the country. In doing so, I felt that I may be able to find answers to some of the questions that have evaded me up until now.

For those of you who have never heard of Ibri, let alone Oman, here’s a brief background. Oman is located in the Arabian Gulf, surrounded by the…

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Wildmind Meditation News

Aug 17, 2013

Happy in meditation

Emily Maddern, NewarkAdvocate.com: Kathy Wesley glows as she talks about meditation.

Meditation not only is a practice Wesley has dedicated her life to sharing with others, but one she considers to be life-changing in the most personal way.

“Meditation is the best thing that ever happened in my life,” she said. “It relieved my stress and it lifted this feeling of gloom that I’d had in my life for years. It was magical.”

The former Advocate reporter turned Buddhist lama has been helping Central Ohioans unlock their inner peace through meditation for more than 20 years.

Her journey began her senior year in college…

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Wildmind Meditation News

Aug 13, 2013

Practice Meditation in New Hampshire

meditation3Madison Kramer, nhmagazine.com: Day planners are filled to capacity with scribbles on every line. Work days have never felt so crammed. To-do lists are longer than ever before. We are busy and we can feel it — in our bodies and in our minds. Although our society has made the idea of burning the candle at both ends sound fulfilling, the reality is that we just feel drained.

We know we can’t fix the cause. Life does not slow down. Business must be done. No one has figured out a way to add more hours to the day or an extra day to the…

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Wildmind Meditation News

Aug 08, 2013

Dalai Lama’s demand for greater autonomy rejected by China

Harold Mandel, examiner.com: His Holiness the Dalai Lama’s hopes that Beijing would give serious consideration to his desire for autonomy for Tibet have been thwarted by China. The Tibet Sun reported on August 7, 2013 that China has rejected the Dalai Lama’s demand for greater autonomy. China has said the Dalai Lama’s demand for a “high degree of autonomy” for Tibet went against the Chinese Constitution and the “fundamental interests of Tibetan Buddhism”.

Yu Zhengsheng, a senior leader of the ruling Communist Party of China, said in his talks with Buddhist monks and religious officials during his current tour of Tibet, “Dalai Lama’s so-called “high-degree of…

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Wildmind Meditation News

Aug 02, 2013

How does meditation actually work?

Christof Koch, Salon: Knowledge can be communicated, but not wisdom. One can find it, live it, do wonders through it, but one cannot communicate and teach it.

This line from Herman Hesse’s 1922 novel Siddhartha came unbidden to me during a recent weeklong visit to Drepung Monastery in southern India. His Holiness the Dalai Lama had invited the U.S.-based Mind and Life Institute to familiarize the Tibetan Buddhist monastic community living in exile in India with modern science. About a dozen of us—physicists, psychologists, brain scientists and clinicians, leavened by a French philosopher—introduced quantum mechanics, neuroscience, consciousness and various clinical aspects of meditative practices…

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Mandy Sutter

Aug 01, 2013

Can Byron Katie help our Buddhist practice?

Byron KatieI came across the work of American self help guru Byron Katie ten years ago. She has published a variety of books which offer a series of simple questions designed to challenge and overturn your perception of any situation you’re struggling with. The questions work by flooding your mind with the ‘fresh air’ of a new (often reversed) perspective.

It’s an appealing technique when you’re in pain. But her techniques always struck me as being like Paracetamol – a short term solution. My old views always came back, dragging their long tail of complicated emotional responses. What’s more, the persistence and tenacity of my habitual thought patterns endowed them, …

Wildmind Meditation News

Jul 26, 2013

Meditation’s next frontier: Improving customer service

Knowledge@Wharton: The role of meditation in enhancing individual performance, leadership and productivity is well documented. However, a recent study captures its uses in evoking compassion — as the Buddha originally intended. Businesses could use that insight and meditation as a tool to foster closer bonding between employees and to spur them to serve customers better, according to Wharton management professor Sigal Barsade.

A recent article in The New York Times by David DeSteno, a professor of psychology at Northwestern University, describes how he, along with psychologist Paul Condon, neuroscientist Gaelle Desbordes and Buddhist lama Willa Miller, conducted an experiment in meditation that…

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