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Sit : Love : Give

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You are browsing all posts tagged with the topic: compassion

Rick Hanson PhD

Mar 25, 2014

Love freely

Heart.In my early 20′s, I went through Rolfing, a form of deep-tissue bodywork, and I nervously anticipated the 5th session, the one that goes deep into the belly. But instead of gobs of repressed emotional pain, what poured out was love – waves and waves of love that I’d pushed down due to embarrassment, fears of closeness, and my struggles with my mother.

It felt fantastic to let love flow freely. Compassion, empathy, kindness, liking, affection, cooperation, and altruism are all in our nature, woven into the fabric of human DNA, the most social – and most loving – species on the planet. Love is a natural upwelling current inside us all. It …

Wildmind Meditation News

Mar 18, 2014

Buddhist economics: oxymoron or idea whose time has come?

wildmind meditation newsKathleen Maclay, UC Berkeley: UC Berkeley economist Clair Brown acknowledges that “Buddhist economics” may seem like an oxymoron.

Nevertheless, she’s teaching a sophomore seminar on the topic this semester — the campus’s second such offering over the past year.

Brown said she created the one-unit Buddhist Economics course after students in her Introductory Economics (Econ 1) class expressed frustration with the relentless Madison Avenue message that more is better, economic growth paves the path to a better life and “retail therapy” is a quick trip to nirvana.

Nicholas Austin, an economics major from Laguna Beach, Calif., and a student this spring in Brown’s Buddhist …

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Wildmind Meditation News

Mar 13, 2014

Meditation experts discuss the real secrets to mindfulness at work

wildmind meditation newsThe Huffington Post: Once a niche activity for the spiritual set, meditation and mindfulness have made their way into the corporate world, with numerous CEOs opening up about their meditation practices, and more and more companies offering mindfulness training programs for their employees.

So what do the leaders of the mindfulness movement have to say about these shifts occurring in the workplace? During a panel discussion at the Rubin Museum on Monday co-hosted by the Garrison Institute, meditation expert Sharon Salzberg, Focus author Daniel Goleman and Janice Marturano, founder of the Mindful Leadership Institute, discussed the mindfulness at work phenomenon with host David …

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Wildmind Meditation News

Mar 03, 2014

Meditation as medicine?

wildmind meditation newsBusiness2Community.com: For centuries, people have meditated to gain deeper insight and wisdom about themselves and their lives. More recently, researchers have studied meditation to gain insight about its effect on psychological wellbeing. Can it help ease pain, depression, or anxiety? Does it relieve stress, improve mood and concentration, or short-circuit substance abuse? What is its effect on sleep and weight?

To find out exactly what meditation can and cannot do, Madhav Goya, M.D., M.P.H, assistant professor of medicine in the division of general internal medicine at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, conducted a review of the study literature to date. Dr. Goyal …

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Rick Hanson PhD

Feb 26, 2014

Rest in Center

Wood carving Buddha in the trunk of treeGravity and entropy are powerful processes in the natural world. Gravity draws things together, toward a center, while entropy scatters them into disorder. In much the same way, in our own lives, some things bring us to center, while others disturb and disperse us.

In terms of centering, be aware of your whole body as you take a long slow breath, or think of something you’re glad about. You’ll probably feel more at home in yourself, more drawn into your own core rather than feeling like Garfield the cartoon cat, spreadeagled up against a pane of glass.

In terms of feeling scattered, notice what it’s like to …

Bodhipaksa

Nov 01, 2013

Words of kindness, words of compassion

Buddha Close UpThere are many ways to develop metta (kindness, or lovingkindness), which is the desire that beings, ourselves included, be happy. Kindness arises from a basic realization that all beings want to be happy, and that their happiness and suffering are as real to them as our own happiness and suffering are to us. Recognizing those facts, and knowing that we ourselves want to be happy, we naturally wish happiness for others.

Kindness is inherent in us all, and in the meditation practice we’re strengthening what’s already there, not bringing something entirely new into being.

The most well-known way to cultivate metta is drop phrases into the mind that strengthen and develop our …

Rick Hanson PhD

Oct 23, 2013

What do you give?

Hanson_thGiving – to others, to the world, to oneself – is deep in our nature as human beings.

When our mammalian ancestors first appeared, about two hundred million years ago, their capacities for bonding, emotion, and generosity were extraordinary evolutionary breakthroughs. Unlike reptiles and fish, mammals and birds care for their young, pair bond (sometimes for life), and usually form complex social groups organized around various kinds of cooperation. This takes more smarts than, say, a fish laying a swarm of eggs and swimming away – so in proportion to body weight, mammals and birds have bigger brains than reptiles and fish do.

When primates came along about sixty million years ago, there …

Wildmind Meditation News

Oct 23, 2013

Mindfulness benefits overall health

U-T, San Diego: When I observed that the Mayo Clinic Health Letter had devoted an entire special section to mindfulness, I thought, this looks like something to share.

According to the Health Letter, “It was originally conceived as a way to ease suffering and cultivate compassion.” That sentence is derivative of no specific religion or culture. Despite the fact that mindfulness has roots in Buddhism, it is relevant to all religions. As a religious or psychological concept it is the focusing of attention and awareness on the present. “… (R)esearch has found therapy based on mindfulness to be effective, particularly for reducing anxiety…

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Wildmind Meditation News

Oct 12, 2013

Buddhism, Christianity share goals: Dalai Lama

globalpost: The Dalai Lama told Mexicans on Saturday that Christianity and Buddhism coincide in their pursuit of human happiness.

Both religions promote “love, compassion and self-discipline” that lead to happiness, the exiled Tibetan spiritual leader told some 3,000 people.

More than 90 percent of Mexico’s 118 million people are Catholic.

With his usual smile and good humor, the Dalai Lama said that for decades, Christian leaders have been interested in some Buddhist teachings.

Christianity promotes the concept of a transcendent and unique God as creator, while Buddhism refutes the existence of a creator.

The Dalai Lama’s trip, which began Friday, marks his fourth to Mexico…

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Wildmind Meditation News

Sep 09, 2013

Surprising ally for snow leopards: Buddhist monks

Tia Ghose, LiveScience: The endangered snow leopard has some allies in unexpected places.

The leopards are being protected by hundreds of Buddhist monasteries on the Tibetan plateau, new research suggests.

The scientists, who detailed their study last week in the journal Conservation Biology, found that half of the monasteries are within the snow leopards’ habitat and that monks patrol the wilderness to prevent poachers from killing the rare cats.

“Buddhism has as a basic tenet — the love, respect, and compassion for all living beings,” said study co-author George Schaller, a biologist with the endangered cat conservation group Panthera, in a statement. “This report …

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