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You are browsing all posts tagged with the topic: emotions

Wildmind Meditation News

Jul 14, 2014

6 steps to mindfully tune the instrument of self

wildmind meditation newsRonald Alexander, Ph.D., Huffington Post: Mindfulness is an idea from Buddhism that’s central to meditation, but it’s also a way of life and a crucial tool in living each moment to its fullest. You establish a practice of meditation in order to develop the habit of mindfulness so that your awareness remains engaged when you leave the meditation cushion and go out into the world. Mindfulness allows you to act consciously instead of unconsciously. You are able to quickly and naturally become aware of what’s really going on in any situation instead of being distracted by your thoughts, feelings and actions.

Too often …

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Wildmind Meditation News

Jul 11, 2014

Prevention Research Center receives $1.4 million mindfulness research grant

wildmind meditation newsLee Carpenter, Penn State News: Grant from the Institute on Education Sciences focuses on teaching adolescents mindfulness practices.

Teaching adolescents mindfulness practices that may strengthen their attention, executive function and emotion regulation skills, and in turn improve their academic and social functioning is the focus of a new grant received by the Bennett Pierce Prevention Research Center at Penn State. Mark Greenberg, Edna Peterson Bennett Endowed Chair in Prevention Research and professor of human development and psychology, is the principal investigator.

The three-year, $1.4 million grant from the Institute on Education Sciences will enable the integration of mindfulness practices and teachings into the regular …

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Rick Hanson PhD

Jul 08, 2014

Emotion in the brain

Young boy playing in the sprinklers outdoorsThe major brain regions that support emotional processing include the limbic system – particularly the hippocampus, amygdala, and hypothalamus – and the prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), nucleus accumbens, and insula. Technical note: there are two hippocampi, one in each hemisphere of the brain; the same for the two amygdalae, ACCs, and insulae. Following common practice, we’ll mainly use the singular form.

By the way, as an interesting evolutionary detail, the limbic system seems to have evolved from the olfactory (scent) neural circuitry in the brain developed by our ancient mammal ancestors, living around 180 million years ago. They seem to have used their advanced sense …

Wildmind Meditation News

Jun 28, 2014

The dark knight of the soul

wildmind meditation newsTomas Rocha, The Atlantic: For some, meditation has become more curse than cure. Willoughby Britton wants to know why.

Set back on quiet College Hill in Providence, Rhode Island, sits a dignified, four story, 19th-century house that belongs to Dr. Willoughby Britton. Inside, it is warm, spacious, and organized. The shelves are stocked with organic foods. A solid wood dining room table seats up to 12. Plants are ubiquitous. Comfortable pillows are never far from reach. The basement—with its own bed, living space, and private bathroom—often hosts a rotating cast of yogis and meditation teachers. Britton’s own living space and office are on the …

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Wildmind Meditation News

Jun 25, 2014

Mindfulness for children

wildmind meditation newsGail Innis, Michigan State University Extension: It’s not just another way to get your kids to pay attention to you.

“Pay attention!” or “Why can’t you pay attention?” How many times have you said this to a child? We often expect that children should pay attention to us, their surroundings and their actions yet how do they actually learn to pay attention? According to Michigan State University Extension, paying attention isn’t easy when there are lots of things going on vying for your attention.
Research shows that when children are able to manage their own emotions and get along well with others (social …

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Wildmind Meditation News

May 18, 2014

Concentrative or nondirective meditation? Which does science say works better?

wildmind meditation newsScience2.0.com: Mindfulness. Zen. Meditation drumming. Chakra. Buddhist and transcendental meditation. It evokes eastern mystics and hip elites in California pretending to to leave their corporeal forms behind and achieve some higher state of being.

But what about poor stressed-out wretches that can’t afford to fly in big-name Yogis? What does the research say? Not much.

But researchers would like to change that – fMRI imaging can tell us very little about what is really happening, but it’s a start. The authors of a new paper on meditation say that different meditation techniques can actually be divided into two main groups.

One type is concentrative …

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Wildmind Meditation News

Mar 20, 2014

Mindfulness: Is it a fad or a powerful life-changing coping skill? A look at the science.

wildmind meditation newsAmanda Mascarelli, The Washington Post: Imagine this scenario: You come home from work tired and frazzled, and your little kids are running wild. Perhaps this doesn’t require much imagination. People in such situations might find solace in a popular meditative practice called mindfulness.

With mindfulness, you train your mind to focus on the present and respond with reason before emotion. It’s about taking a pause and guiding yourself to become “aware enough in the moment so that before you react, you’re aware of how you’re responding to a situation,” says Ronald Epstein, a professor of family medicine at the University of Rochester Medical …

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Wildmind Meditation News

Mar 03, 2014

Mindful meditation at school makes kids go ommm

wildmind meditation newsMary MacVean, Los Angles Times: Hundreds of schools in California alone have mindful meditation programs, and educators see benefits. Mindfulness is said to help with focus, attention, calming the emotions and school performance.

Erica Eihl speaks in a voice that her kindergartners can hear only if they are as quiet as the church mice in children’s storybooks.

And with a couple of squirrelly exceptions, they stay that quiet for 15 or 20 minutes — a near eternity — as Eihl guides them to use all their senses to consider a piece of apple, with directions such as, “Looking at the apple, look on the outside …

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Wildmind Meditation News

Feb 27, 2014

The mental and physical benefits of mindfulness meditation

wildmind meditation newsINSPIRE MALIBU: What began as one of the seven factors of enlightenment according to Buddhist teachings, Mindfulness Meditation is quickly spreading throughout Western society as a way to become more focused and relaxed mentally.

Scientific research has confirmed many of the benefits of Mindfulness including motivation, empathy, and the regulation of emotions. People of all ages and all walks of life can realize the mental and physical benefits of Mindfulness.

What is Mindfulness?
In its simplest terms, Mindfulness involves living in the present moment, and paying special attention to whatever it is you are currently doing. If you’re eating an apple, closely examine …

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Rick Hanson PhD

Feb 26, 2014

Rest in Center

Wood carving Buddha in the trunk of treeGravity and entropy are powerful processes in the natural world. Gravity draws things together, toward a center, while entropy scatters them into disorder. In much the same way, in our own lives, some things bring us to center, while others disturb and disperse us.

In terms of centering, be aware of your whole body as you take a long slow breath, or think of something you’re glad about. You’ll probably feel more at home in yourself, more drawn into your own core rather than feeling like Garfield the cartoon cat, spreadeagled up against a pane of glass.

In terms of feeling scattered, notice what it’s like to …