Wildmind Buddhist Meditation

Sit : Love : Give

Wildmind is ad-free, and it takes many hours each month to create and edit the posts you see here. If you benefit from what we do here, please support Wildmind with a monthly donation.


You can also become a one-time benefactor with a single donation of any amount:


Blog

You are browsing all posts tagged with the topic: families

Bodhipaksa

Sep 11, 2013

Seven ways to teach your children mindfulness

child meditatingHere are seven practices that you can do with young children, to help bring mindfulness into your home.

  • Just before leaving for school in the morning, stand together and take three mindful breaths.
  • When your child comes home from school, give him or her a piece of fruit and ask them to pretend they are from another planet and have never seen this piece of fruit before. Ask them to describe their experience using all five senses. What does it look like? Smell like? Feel like? Taste like? Does it make a sound when they bite it?
  • Take three mindful breaths as a family before eating and try to begin the meal mindfully.
  • Go
  • Mandy Sutter

    Jan 06, 2013

    “Zombies on Kilimanjaro,” by Tim Ward

    Available on Amazon.com and Amazon.co.uk.
    Available on Amazon.com and Amazon.co.uk.

    ‘”Your guide will probably tell you,” Ezekiel said, “that the name Kilimanjaro comes from kilima, the Swahili word for ‘mountain’ and jaro, the Maasai word for ‘snow-capped.’ But that’s just for the tourists. We Chagga people who have always lived here, we believe the name comes from our own language: kilema-kyaro, which means ‘Impossible to Climb.’”’

    So begins Buddhist writer Tim Ward’s latest book, ‘Zombies on Kilimanjaro,’ an intriguingly and perhaps misleadingly titled memoir about climbing the highest freestanding mountain in the world with his 20-year-old son, Josh.

    It’s a good beginning, plunging the reader straight into the ‘plot’ of …

    Bodhipaksa

    May 16, 2011

    “Buddha at Bedtime,” by Dharmachari Nagaraja

    Recently I walked into a bookstore and saw a spine bearing the title “Buddha at Bedtime.” As the father of two young children who always want a good story at bedtime, I was delighted to know that this book existed. I was even more delighted — and surprised — when I pulled the book from the shelf and realized that I knew the author, Nagaraja.

    So for full disclosure, I first met Nagaraja at the Glasgow Buddhist Center over 20 years ago, and although we’ve never been close friends, we were ordained together and I’ve sometimes asked him to review books for me. But our connection is weak enough that his book …

    Bodhipaksa

    Aug 05, 2010

    Meditation for children

    maia sitting cross-leggedFor the last six weeks I’ve been teaching a class at the University of New Hampshire’s Upward Bound program. The class is called “Success Studies” and it’s a combination of study skills and personal development, aimed at teens from impoverished backgrounds. The aim is to prepare them from college in order to break the cycle of poverty that affects poor communities.

    We’ve done some meditation in every class; not much, just five or six minutes at a time during which we’ve explored the breath, learned different ways of paying attention that can help calm us or make us more alert, and cultivated lovingkindness. Most of the students seemed …

    Bodhipaksa

    Aug 13, 2009

    Moody Cow Meditates, by Kerry Lee MacLean

    Moody CowThere are far too few books on meditation for children, and Kerry Lee MacLean’s Moody Cow should be a welcome addition to the book collection of any meditator’s child. But Bodhipaksa has some concerns. Find out why.

    “My name is Moody Cow. It used to be Peter, but now it’s Moody Cow. It all started one stupid, rotten day when everything went wrong…”

    So begins the story, which introduces us to Peter the calf, his sister Daisy, and his mother. We also get to meet a Peter’s grandfather, who plays a pivotal role as the wise man of the family. Peter’s father is strangely absent, although we do get to see his car. Fathers do …