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Sit : Love : Give

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Wildmind Meditation News

Oct 22, 2014

Understanding depression: mindfulness and acceptance

wildmind meditation newsKate Lochte & Matt Markgraf, WKMS.org: “One of the cornerstones of treatments for depression is getting out and moving in the world in ways that matter to the individual,” says Dr. Michael Bordieri, assistant professor of psychology at Murray State University. Mindfulness can be a way to help achieve that, by becoming aware of ones thoughts and not changing them, but rather letting them go. This is the topic of the fourth conversation in our series on understanding depression: the emerging therapeutic use of mindfulness.

Mindfulness isn’t necessarily new, it’s been practiced in eastern medicine for centuries. New to western scientific scrutiny and …

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Mark Tillotson

Oct 22, 2014

Sit : Breathe : Love (Oct 27 – Nov 23)

YOGD_email_graphic_sitbreatheloveWant to experience the physical and mental health benefits of meditation, but have trouble setting up a regular practice?

Sit : Breathe : Love is a 28 Day Meditation Challenge, with the aim of helping you to set up the habit of meditating daily.

The benefits of regular meditation have been demonstrated again and again in multiple studies. Meditating makes you happier, is good for your health, protects your brain from aging, boosts your intelligence, and helps reduce pain, stress, and depression.

But it’s not easy to set up a regular meditation practice.

So we’re here to help you!

The aims in the 28 Day Challenge are:

  • To work toward building up a daily habit of meditation
  • If possible,

Wildmind Meditation News

Oct 21, 2014

‘Mindful’ commuters say deep breaths, clear mind keep them calm under stress

wildmind meditation newsKatherine Shaver, Washington Post: As harried commuters filed aboard a Metro Red Line train at Cleveland Park — jockeying for seats, hoisting bulging tote bags — Denise Keyes gazed straight ahead, took deep breaths and searched for inner peace.

There were no lit candles, no incense, no chanting of “om.” But Keyes was meditating.

Finding stillness on a subway during rush hour might sound impossible. But those who practice “mindful commuting” swear it brings tranquility to the daily misery of crowded trains, late buses, honking horns and traffic jams.

If it sounds too New-Agey or out there for you, consider this: Almost 2 million …

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Mark Tillotson

Oct 20, 2014

The Power of Mindfulness: an introductory meditation course begins November 3, 2014

1403 POM 295x350Do you want to be calmer, happier, and experience more freedom from stress? Mindfulness has been clinically proven to reduce stress, promote feelings of wellbeing, and improve mental and physical health.

The next Power of Mindfulness online course starts November 3, 2014. It’s a four-week meditation course that’s accessible 24 hours a day, every day of the week, wherever you are. All you need is an internet browser. You can even participate on an iPad or other mobile device.

The convenience makes this perfect for people who don’t have meditation classes nearby, or who work irregular hours or who can’t travel because of illness, childcare arrangements, etc.

The course is web-based, and involves …

Wildmind Meditation News

Oct 20, 2014

Mindfulness: does it really live up to the hype?

wildmind meditation newsPolly Vernon, The Telegraph: Happier, healthier and better rested: that’s what 20 minutes a day of meditation has done for one writer. And as a resolute sceptic, she couldn’t be more surprised.

It may be a little early for bold proclamations of this nature, but still: I would bet big money on “mindfulness” being the Oxford English Dictionary’s word of 2014. It was “selfie” in 2013, you’ll recall, and “omnishambles” the year before that. We will have to wait a couple of weeks for the OED to make its decision final, official and public, but still… I am confident.

The Buddhist discipline – which encourages …

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Wildmind Meditation News

Oct 10, 2014

The skeptic’s guide to meditation (infographic)

wildmind meditation newsHappify, Huffington Post: Lately, it seems that meditation has become as prominent in the workplace as weekly meetings — and there couldn’t be a greater reason for it.

Research suggests the practice can help boost focus, lower stress and make us more compassionate — not to mention the calming ritual also has a myriad of physical health benefits. Yet, despite the overwhelming positives meditation has, people still have reservations about committing to it.

For the more apprehensive folks out there, Happify, a website dedicated to helping people build skills for happiness through science-based activities and games, put together an infographic to conquer that skepticism.

Read …

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Wildmind Meditation News

Oct 08, 2014

Go on, laugh your heart out. It’s good for you

wildmind meditation newsKristine Crane, US News: When Carla Riechman laughs, you hear it.

With her big laughter, the former District of Columbia school teacher has been compared to the laughing Buddha, and it’s a comparison she welcomes. She helps people laugh, which in turn helps them meditate.

“Laughter brings one to silence,” says Riechman, 63, who calls herself the professional “giggle lady.” She established the “laughter revolution,” a laughter meditation program based in the District of Columbia that provides people with hourlong sessions in which they laugh and then meditate. She hosts laughter sessions at people’s homes and local wellness centers, as well as online at …

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Wildmind Meditation News

Oct 06, 2014

Mindfulness practice is good medicine

wildmind meditation newsMack Paul, The Norman Transcript: Buddhism is not a religion in the usual sense. There is not a God to believe in.

Some Buddhists believe in reincarnation and karma although neither are central to the faith. The Buddha said that he taught one thing only, “suffering and the end of suffering.”

Buddhist practice developed from their observation that human existence is characterized by the experience, dissatisfaction, impermanence and a shifting sense of self that is unsatisfactory and impermanent. This makes for a potentially bleak view of the human condition.

We want to believe in progress. We want to believe that if we get …

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Wildmind Meditation News

Oct 03, 2014

5 Tips for practicing mindfulness at the office

wildmind meditation newsJanice Marturano, Mindful Magazine: Mindfulness training is about your life. It isn’t about the time you meditate on a cushion or chair. It is about learning to be awake for each moment of your life. So bringing your training into the moments in the day is a necessary requirement.

The good news is that you can bring your training into everyday moments without adding any more demands on your already too-packed schedule. I like to call these moments Purposeful Pauses. It isn’t just about stopping, it is about noticing what is here to be noticed when you stop. And it is about redirecting …

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Wildmind Meditation News

Oct 02, 2014

How mindfulness can help preschool teachers cope

wildmind meditation newsDave Shaw, The Epoch Times: A new survey of early childhood education teachers shows that mindfulness is linked with alleviating lasting physical and emotional effects of childhood adversity.

The findings are especially important because adults who were abused or neglected as children typically experience poorer health, according to Robert Whitaker, professor of public health and pediatrics at Temple University.

“Previous research has shown that childhood traumas worsen adult health through changes in how the body responds to stress,” says Whitaker, who led the new study in Preventative Medicine. He adds that some people might adopt poor health behaviors, like smoking, to cope with …

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