Bipolar disorder and meditation

July 16, 2013

Kat Dawkins, PsychCentral: These days, many people are turning to natural health aids to help compliment the use of medication and therapies.

When someone is being treated for bipolar disorder, their psychiatrists often recommend a strict diet and regular exercise to help combat the depression, anxiety, and mood swings that come with the illness.

The use of meditation is another way that many people deal with the troubling symptoms of depression and mania.

History of Meditation

Meditation has been used for thousands of years to renew the spirit and calm the mind.

Buddhist meditation and yoga have helped evolve other modern relaxation techniques.,,

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Are mindfulness benefits too good to be true?

Carole Carson, AARP blog: Is Mindfulness the Latest Fad? Are the Benefits Too Good to Be True?

Would you be skeptical if I told you that without taking a pill or seeing a therapist, you could lower your blood pressure, raise your self-esteem, experience equanimity in the face of stress, improve the quality of your sleep, reduce chronic pain, get greater enjoyment from eating even while eating less, increase your energy and make better decisions? That you could be happier and see the world around you more positively?

The practitioners of mindfulness make these and other remarkable claims—and their claims are not…

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Learning to see with the eyes of wholeness (Day 8)

April 19, 2013

Lotus, isolated on whiteA sticking point some people have with lovingkindness practice is what it means to wish someone “well.” This came up the other day with someone who has health difficulties that just aren’t going to go away. What does it mean for him to wish himself well? He’s not ever going to be completely healthy, so wellness is never going to be attained. What’s the point of wishing yourself something you can’t have? Isn’t that just a source of suffering. Yikes!

And the same applies to others. If you have a friend who’s, say, dying of cancer, what does it mean to wish them well?

There’s a nice little dialog that the Buddha has where he … Read more »

Exercising your brain may improve your life

February 10, 2013

Wynne Parry, LiveScience. Throughout life, even shortly before death, the brain can remodel itself, responding to a person’s experiences. This phenomenon, known as neuroplasticity, offers a powerful tool to improve well-being, experts say.

“We now have evidence that engaging in pure mental training can induce changes not just in the function of the brain, but in the brain’s structure itself,” Richard Davidson, a neuroscientist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, told an audience at the New York Academy of Sciences on Thursday (Feb. 6) evening.

The brain’s plasticity does change over time, Davidson pointed out. For instance, young children have an easier time learning a second language or a musical instrument…

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Mindfulness meditation eases stress, anxiety

January 11, 2013

Jason Ashley Wright, World Scene: Rebeka Radcliff struggled with anxiety for a long time.

She started running marathons to try to manage it. The long distances helped, she said, but it wasn’t enough.

“I would go for a run, feel relaxed for a few hours or even for the rest of the day, but then the anxiety would be back again,” Radcliff said.

Eventually, she realized that running couldn’t be her ultimate anxiety solution. She didn’t feel it was severe enough to warrant medication, and she believed there was a way to use mind over matter to manage it.

Then, she became pregnant …

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Know Thyself: Approaching meditation with mindfulness

December 29, 2012

Nancy B. Loughlin, Baby steps will help you learn how to live in the moment and quiet your restless mind.

A profound irony of stress is that the best way to manage it is to get deeper into it.

This is called “mindfulness,” and it’s Meditation 101.

For many, meditation’s serenity is out of reach because their minds are, well, a mess. Chilling may be attractive, but clearing the mind while perched on a floor pillow will drive Type As to scream.

Madeline Ebelini was an attorney for 20 years and her body reflected all that implies: insomnia, worry and pain. Sleeping became a …

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Stressed out? Try mindfulness meditation

September 18, 2012

Meryl Davids Landau, US News: One of the hottest forms of stress reduction today is actually one of the oldest: meditation. But the kind making the rounds of hospitals, community centers, and even schools in increasing numbers doesn’t involve chanting “Om” while sitting on a cushion with closed eyes; instead, participants are trained to pay attention to their thoughts, emotions, and bodily sensations, and to view them neutrally, “without assigning an emotional value that they are strongly positive or negative,” says University of Wisconsin–Madison neuroscientist Richard Davidson, coauthor of The Emotional Life of Your Brain.

The idea is to allow parts of the …

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Mindfulness goes mainstream (video)

July 28, 2012


Meditation puts pain in its proper place

July 18, 2012

We sat in the cool, calm and peaceful surroundings of The (Breast Cancer) Haven in Fulham, London. We closed our eyes and listened to Dr. Caroline Hoffman take us through a Mindfulness experience. This form of meditation was developed by Jon Kabat-Zinn of the University of Massachusetts Medical Centre in the 1970’s and has become hugely popular with all sorts of unlikely participants.

We were there to see and hear how it might benefit not only those with breast cancer, but almost everyone. We concentrated on our breathing, trying to be “in the moment”, focusing on the five senses and, all the time …

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In meditative mindfulness, Rep. Tim Ryan sees a cure for many American ills

April 9, 2012

Neely Tucker, Washington Post: Rep. Tim Ryan (D) is a five-term incumbent from the heartland. His Ohio district includes Youngstown and Warren and part of Akron and smaller places. He’s 38, Catholic, single. He was a star quarterback in high school. He lives a few houses down from his childhood home in Niles. He’s won three of his five elections with about 75 percent of the vote.

So when he starts talking about his life-changing moment after the 2008 race, you’re not expecting him to lean forward at the lunch table and tell you, with great sincerity, that this little story of American politics is about …

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