Wildmind Buddhist Meditation

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You are browsing all posts tagged with the topic: judging

Bodhipaksa

Sep 10, 2013

Any meditation you can walk away from is a good meditation

chuck-yeager

Meditation’s not necessarily going to be easy or pleasant. You may find that you’re sitting with a chaotic mind, or that you’re falling asleep, or that you have physical discomfort. And there can be a tendency to label those times as “bad” meditations.

If that happens to you, I have two sayings that you might find useful:

  • “Any meditation you can walk away from is a good meditation.”
  • “The only bad meditation is the one you didn’t do.”
  • It’s the doing of the practice that’s the main thing; whether or not there was pleasure present isn’t that important.

    Ironically, though, the less you worry about whether your meditation is pleasant or not and the more you …

    Bodhipaksa

    Jan 14, 2013

    Day 14 of Wildmind’s 100 Day Meditation Challenge

    100 day meditation challenge 014Stuart Valentine, who’s participating in the 100 Day Challenge, wrote about how fear of other’s judgements can stop us from getting started:

    Being a born pessimist, one of the first things that occurred to me about the 100 Day Challenge was that if I did it, I would have to do it PERFECTLY. And this was clearly impossible, so there was no point trying.

    ‘Scoring’ just 99 out of 100 would be a disaster. I would feel irritated with myself, embarrassed, would have let myself and others down… and many other negative emotions I projected on to this ‘awful’ event.

    If I ended on 90 out of 100, or heavens forbid

    Bodhipaksa

    Jan 11, 2013

    Day 11 of Wildmind’s 100 Day Meditation Challenge

    100 day meditation challenge 011It astonishes me how much time I spend making judgements about people, but the truly surprising thing is that although it makes me feel bad, I keep doing it. And it leads to unfortunate interactions with people which ends up causing them suffering too.

    One thing that protects us against this kind of self-imposed suffering is lovingkindness (metta) practice. Lovingkindness is an important complement to mindfulness practice.

    To cultivate metta we can do something as simple as repeat to ourselves, “May you be well; may you be happy” as we see others. We can do this while walking or driving, for example.

    We can take a more reflective approach …

    Bodhipaksa

    Aug 30, 2011

    Mindfulness and wise discrimination

    You can’t read much about the important quality of mindfulness without learning that it involves being nonjudgmental – that it involves setting aside discriminations and simply accepting our experience.

    For example, Jon Kabat-Zinn’s informal definition of mindfulness (from Wherever You Go, There You Are) reads: “Mindfulness means paying attention in a particular way: on purpose, in the present moment, and nonjudgmentally.”

    I use that kind of language myself sometimes, but I also notice that it’s subtly, and sometimes not so subtly, misleading.

    Certainly, mindfulness has a quality of equanimity about it. Equanimity is a quality of calmness and composure. To give a negative example, I was recently leading a retreat, and in …

    Srimati

    Jan 07, 2010

    Integrating spirituality with business (part 2)

    In this short video, Inspired Entrepreneur Nick Williams talks with Srimati, a former member of the Western Buddhist Order, about the relationship between spirituality and business, and how love and fear are opposed tendencies in both worlds as judgment and rejection of parts of ourselves..

    Srimati is a freelance spiritual teacher, writer and co-founder of Thrivecraft Coaching, and a former member of the Western Buddhist Order.

    She is currently engaged in publishing her whole body of work via books, articles, CDs, films, and the internet. Her aim is to contribute accessible and relevant spiritual intelligence to mainstream modern life and business. Srimati’s CD, …

    Auntie Suvanna

    May 16, 2008

    Ask Auntie Suvanna: Connection before correction

    Freaks movie posterDear Auntie,

    I am a Buddhist working in rehab, which is a very Christian environment, so I was happy to discover a co-worker sporting Buddhist memorabilia at her work site. I wanted to have a friendship with this woman because I believed we might have a lot in common, at least spiritually. However, all my attempts to get to know more about her have been thwarted.

    When I ask her about herself she changes the subject or says let’s talk about that sometime… then we never do. She never reveals anything. Most of my co-workers don’t like her and the patients complain about her. They say she doesn’t listen and is not …