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You are browsing all posts tagged with the topic: meditation techniques

Wildmind Meditation News

Oct 15, 2014

Five common myths about meditation debunked

wildmind meditation newsMihir Patkar, Lifehacker: You’ve probably heard that meditation can be beneficial, but how much do you actually know about it? Many aspects of meditation are often misunderstood or misinterpreted. Let’s debunk some of these myths so you can start reaping the rewards.

Myth: Meditation is About Clearing Your Mind of All Thoughts
In its purest form, meditation is about focusing on emptiness. However, you don’t have to do that. Meditation is effective as long as you merely minimize distracting thoughts.

Mindfulness meditation is perhaps the most accessible form of meditation. And as psychologist Mike Brooks puts it, with mindfulness meditation, it’s not about …

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Wildmind Meditation News

Sep 24, 2014

Can you meditate with your eyes wide open?

wildmind meditation newsRose Caiola, Huffington Post: I’ve been a dedicated meditation practitioner for more than a decade and I always keep my eyes open for new techniques. Now keeping my “eyes open” can be taken literally–because I’ve learned about the benefits of meditating without closing them.

This was a big departure for me. I had always thought of meditation as a way to keep the external world out of the picture during quiet contemplation. And even though I am very receptive to the benefits of different practices–I’ve tried everything from yogic, mindfulness, and Tibetan mantra meditations to ecstatic dancing and walking a labyrinth–I had assumed …

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Wildmind Meditation News

Sep 09, 2014

How to use distractions to help your meditation

wildmind meditation newsMichael Taft, The Huffington Post: When I first started meditating, one of the hardest things was trying to stay focused. There were just so many things to do, people to interact with, noises like music or blaring car horns that shattered and upset my nascent meditative vibe. I felt like I was drowning. How could I focus in a sea of constant distraction?

The funny thing is that, more than 30 years later, the distractions are still the same. Sirens wail, the bladder complains, people demand my attention, life is moving along in just the same intense, chaotic, confusing manner. If anything, decades of …

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Wildmind Meditation News

Aug 22, 2014

6 tips that prove meditation is way easier than you think

wildmind meditation newsAnna Maltby, Huffington Post: “I’m terrible at trying to meditate — I can never shut off my brain or sit still!” Sound familiar? You know practices like mindfulness meditation are good for you, but they just seem so counter to our 20-tabs-open-at-a-time lifestyle that it’s hard to imagine where to start. We asked Marianela Medrano, Ph.D., a licensed professional counselor and member of the American Counseling Association, for help. Let’s start National Relaxation Day off on a good foot, shall we?

1. It’s not about saying “om” over and over again.
Unlike some types of meditation, you don’t have to say a mantra or try …

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Wildmind Meditation News

May 27, 2013

Buddha Weekly Reports on Meditation Techniques for People with Unsettled Minds, Buddha’s Birthday and Zen Skateboarding

Digital Journal: Toronto, ON (PRWEB)

Buddha Weekly celebrates Wesak, the Buddha’s Birthday, with a profile on the most celebrated Buddhist holiday around the world, and the important of keeping precepts and acting with loving kindness. In the same issue, the magazine covers unconventional meditation techniques for the active monkey mind, including walking, standing and skateboarding.

“Meditation Techniques for People with Unsettled Monkey Minds”
Coping with the Monkey Mind—a Buddhist term indicating “unsettled; restless; capricious; whimsical; fanciful; inconstant; confused; indecisive; uncontrollable”—is one of the biggest obstacles to meditation and mindfulness practice in Buddhism.

The monkey mind disturbs peaceful reflection and creates endless obstacles to…

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