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Wildmind Meditation News

Jul 26, 2013

Meditation’s next frontier: Improving customer service

Knowledge@Wharton: The role of meditation in enhancing individual performance, leadership and productivity is well documented. However, a recent study captures its uses in evoking compassion — as the Buddha originally intended. Businesses could use that insight and meditation as a tool to foster closer bonding between employees and to spur them to serve customers better, according to Wharton management professor Sigal Barsade.

A recent article in The New York Times by David DeSteno, a professor of psychology at Northwestern University, describes how he, along with psychologist Paul Condon, neuroscientist Gaelle Desbordes and Buddhist lama Willa Miller, conducted an experiment in meditation that…

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Wildmind Meditation News

Jul 10, 2013

Meet the “mindfulness” caucus: Politicians who meditate!

Alex Seitz-Wald, Salon: “If this can help me, a half-Irish, half-Italian quarterback from Northeast Ohio, it’s for everybody,” Congressman Tim Ryan says of his meditation practice developed from Buddhist traditions. The lawmaker, one of a growing group of prominent politicians incorporating mindfulness into their worldview and approach, leans back in a chair in his Longworth House Office Building suite, which includes meditation cushions and signed footballs — and even a Bud Light on display behind glass (the aluminum bottle is made in his district). “It’s not woo woo!”

Despite not fitting the profile, Ryan has become an evangelist for meditation on Capitol Hill, encouraging his…

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Wildmind Meditation News

Jul 02, 2013

How Buddhism led to High Street evolution

Jenny Chapman, Cambridge News: He is happy and contented. He is the managing director of a company turning over £11m and his salary is £15,000.

“I live simply, it’s all I need,” says Mike Silver, 49, who heads a team of 250, around 90 at the Windhorse headquarters off Coldhams Lane in Cambridge.

Windhorse, which is a wholesaler of gifts and housewares, started in London’s Bethnal Green in 1980 and has always been a Buddhist organisation.

“We moved to Cambridge to grow and to start Buddhist activities in Cambridge,” says Mike, who joined Windhorse 27 years ago, straight from an economics degree at Manchester.

The Windhorse Buddhists…

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Wildmind Meditation News

Jun 23, 2013

Meditation’s effects on emotion shown to persist

Traci Pedersen, PsychCentral: Meditation affects a person’s brain function long after the act of meditation is over, according to new research.

“This is the first time meditation training has been shown to affect emotional processing in the brain outside of a meditative state,” said Gaelle Desbordes, Ph.D., a research fellow at the Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at Massachusetts General Hospital and at the Boston University Center for Computational Neuroscience and Neural Technology.

“Overall, these results are consistent with the overarching hypothesis that meditation may result in enduring, beneficial changes in brain function, especially in the area of emotional processing…

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Wildmind Meditation News

Jun 20, 2013

Meditation reduces the risk of depression in schoolchildren

Emma Innes, Mail Online: Children who are taught meditation are less likely to develop depression, a new study has revealed.

Teaching children a form of meditation called ‘mindfulness’ – a psychological technique which focuses awareness and attention – can reduce a pupil’s stress levels meaning their mental health improves.

The technique can also improve their academic performance, the researchers found.

Scientists at the University of Exeter, the University of Oxford, the University of Cambridge and the Mindfulness in Schools Project (MiSP), taught 256 pupils aged between 12 and 16 the MiSP curriculum.

The curriculum involved teaching the children nine lessons in how to better control their…

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Wildmind Meditation News

Jun 18, 2013

Enlightenment….

Noah Shachtman, Wired: Chade-Meng Tan is perched on a chair, his lanky body folded into a half-lotus position. “Close your eyes,” he says. His voice is a hypnotic baritone, slow and rhythmic, seductive and gentle. “Allow your attention to rest on your breath: The in-breath, the out-breath, and the spaces in between.” We feel our lungs fill and release. As we focus on the smallest details of our respiration, other thoughts—of work, of family, of money—begin to recede, leaving us alone with the rise and fall of our chests. For thousands of years, these techniques have helped put practitioners into meditative states…

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Wildmind Meditation News

Jun 13, 2013

Meditation helps MS sufferer cope

Steven Impey, Gloucestershire Echo: Having been diagnosed with multiple sclerosis for more than three decades, Steve Brisk has learned to appreciate the subtleties in life.

He was 29 at the time – the average age for adults who suffer from the condition.

Now the 61-year-old, from Woodmancote, is continuing his work to help others suffering from the same symptoms he did.

In the last 30 years, he has raised more than £250,000 for charities connected to the illness.

His therapy is driven through meditation, which allows sufferers to gain a foothold in their hectic lives which can lead to MS via stress or restless nights…

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Wildmind Meditation News

Jun 09, 2013

Meditation helping war veterans

Tim Barlass,The Syndney Morning Herald: Veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder can be treated with transcendental meditation, says a leading US expert on the practice.

Fred Travis of the Maharishi University of Management in Iowa has won a $2.4 million grant from the US Department of Defence for research on the use of meditation to help veterans from the Afghanistan and Iraq conflicts cope with stress.

Dr Travis, who is speaking in Sydney this week, believes its application with Australian Defence Force staff should also be investigated.

Three US studies have shown that transcendental meditation can have remarkable results…

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