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You are browsing all posts tagged with the topic: mindfulness tools

Sunada Takagi

Nov 28, 2011

Sampajañña: unraveling lifelong habits with mindfulness

It’s discouraging, isn’t it, to watch ourselves fall repeatedly into our same old habitual traps. We try to practice mindfulness, but it can be frustrating. Do you ever have days where you’re so caught up that you realize only at night, despite your best intentions, that you weren’t mindful for even one moment?

And it’s especially hard when we’re face to face with lifelong tendencies that resist change in a big way.

But don’t lose heart. It doesn’t mean you’re no good at this. After all, you NOTICED that you weren’t being mindful. That noticing is a positive event. Even though it happened after the fact, …

Sunada Takagi

Oct 31, 2011

STOP and be mindful

People often come to my meditation courses because they want to learn how to slow down their crazy busy lives.

So you start sitting for 10, 20, or maybe even 30 minutes a day. But after some weeks of this, you still feel like things are crazy busy and all over the place. So your meditation isn’t working, you say to me.

Here’s my first thought. I’m wondering if you’re thinking of meditation as something you can drop into your life for say, 30 minutes a day, and have it counterbalance the other 15 or so hours that your mind is on full tilt. (I’m assuming you spend …

Bodhipaksa

Jan 24, 2011

Can you do nothing for two minutes? Come on, give it a try!

do nothing for two minutes

On Facebook the other day I came across a link to an excellent—and very simple—online mindfulness tool.

It’s called “Do nothing for 2 minutes,” and it’s an invitation to sit in front of an ocean landscape, with the gentle sound of waves, and to (well, you guessed it) do nothing.

What makes this interesting is that there’s a timer on the screen that counts down the two minutes second by second, and the timer resets any time you touch the mouse, trackpad, or keyboard. This discourages multitasking and encourages you to, well, Do Nothing for Two Minutes.

It’s a lovely idea.

One person who …