Wildmind Buddhist Meditation

Sit : Love : Give

Wildmind is ad-free, and it takes many hours each month to create and edit the posts you see here. If you benefit from what we do here, please support Wildmind with a monthly donation.


You can also become a one-time benefactor with a single donation of any amount:


Blog

You are browsing all posts tagged with the topic: mindfulness

Wildmind Meditation News

Dec 08, 2013

Meditation generation

Julie Hare, The Australian: Just over four months ago, Ryan Daniels (not his real name) made a life-changing decision. He started practising meditation.

“I’d upped my game and was exercising more and eating better,” says the 40-year-old executive for a not-for-profit organisation. “But I realised despite doing everything right I still wasn’t coping well. Nothing dreadful, but things kept getting on top of me, especially at work.

“Now I meditate every day. I describe it like brushing my teeth. I get up in the morning and do it; I can’t start my day without it.”

Simone Pedersen feels the same way. The business…

Read the original article »

Wildmind Meditation News

Dec 06, 2013

Enlightenment meets Enlightenment: Finding the Buddha in the secular west

Dr. Arnie Kozak, beliefnet: I recently gave a talk at the University of Vermont College of Medicine called “Beyond Stress Reduction: Mindfulness as a Radical Technology. In this talk, I spoke about the indictment that the healthcare and corporate-related applications of mindfulness are tantamount to “McMindfulness.”

If you read my post on this issue, you know that I think the criticisms of secularized mindfulness go to far. In my talk, I made the point that secular dharma is a uniquely Western dharma.

Secular Buddhism, which seeks enlightenment, accords with the Enlightenment era values of rationality, empiricism, and skepticism…

Read the original article »

Bodhipaksa

Nov 21, 2013

Mindfulness of doors (and more!)

mindfully walking through doorsSome of us in Wildmind’s Google Plus community are working our way through exercises from Jan Chozen Bays’ book, How to Train a Wild Elephant. We’re now on week 17 of the book, and this week’s exercise is called “Entering New Spaces.”

Here’s a brief outline of the practice:

The Exercise: Our shorthand for this mindfulness practice is “mindfulness of doors,” but it actually involves bringing awareness to any transition between spaces, when you leave one kind of space and enter another. Before you walk through a door, pause, even for a second, and take one breath. Be aware

Wildmind Meditation News

Nov 04, 2013

Meditation should be more mainstream

Thomas Pollick, The Daily Northwestern: The first time I really learned about meditation was during my sophomore year of high school in an Eastern Religions class. A Buddhist speaker came in to talk about his experiences. Following the talk, I asked him how I could incorporate meditation into my everyday life. He said that every day right after I get up, I should sit on the side of my bed for five minutes and focus on my breathing.

That’s all it was. Just five minutes, focusing on my breathing. Contrary to what I expected, there was no talk of spirituality or references…

Read the original article »

Rick Hanson PhD

Nov 04, 2013

Handling blocks to any inner practice—meditation, yoga, gratitude, mindfulness

When you try to change your life for better, sometimes you bump into a block, such as distracting thoughts. Blocks are common. They’re not bad or wrong—but they do get in the way. What works is to explore them with self-acceptance, and see what you can learn about yourself. One valuable aspect of taking in the good is that it often reveals other issues, such as an underlying reluctance to let yourself feel good. Then you can address these issues with the suggestions below. With practice and time, blocks usually fade away.

Blocks to Any Inner Practice

• Distractibility—Focus on the stimulating aspects of positive experiences, which will keep your attention engaged with them.

• Just not in touch with your body …

Wildmind Meditation News

Oct 31, 2013

Research finds yoga, meditation can help women after cancer

Heather Yourex, Global Toronto: Susan Ockey has been practicing yoga for nearly 5 years. She started her practice after her cancer treatment finished.

“I just got through everything and then about a year later went, ‘oh my goodness… what happened? I had cancer.”

According to clinical psychological, Dr. Linda Carlson, many cancer survivors experience stress and anxiety long after therapy ends.

“It’s a huge problem for many cancer patients. They’re dealing with uncertainty, fears of recurrence, lingering side effects, pain, swelling in the arm, sleep difficulties… and fatigue is a big problem as well…

Read the original article »

Bodhipaksa

Oct 29, 2013

Three steps to mindful smoking

Photo copyright Rob DeWitt.
Photo copyright Rob DeWitt.
Yesterday I wrote about using mindfulness to deal with the craving for tobacco. By coincidence, an old friend, Sagaracitta, has recently published an article on the same topic. It’s a long article, but it contains this handy suggestion for smoking with mindfulness (which I’ve slightly edited).

Before smoking

  • Scan through your body. Make a note of how you are feeling. Then contact your breath.
  • Without altering your breath, just be aware of three full cycles of your breathing.
  • Look at your cigarette packet. Read any warning labels. Just be aware of it.
  • Be aware of one full cycle of your breath. Notice any feelings that

Wildmind Meditation News

Oct 28, 2013

A beginner’s guide to meditation

Amy Malloy: The Age: For many people, meditation falls into the same category as cycling, drinking more water and exfoliating. We suspect we should be doing it; we have friends who swear by it, but who has the time? And will it really make you feel better? The answer is yes: there’s even cold, hard science to prove the benefits.

A 2012 study published in the journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes found regular meditation cut the risk of heart attack and stroke by 48 per cent.

In a series of studies, Professor Herbert Benson of Harvard Medical School also found meditation could help…

Read the original article »

Bodhipaksa

Oct 28, 2013

Is your meditation smoking?

nuns smoking

When I was teaching meditation at the University of Montana I had a student called Connie who was very concerned about her smoking habit. In my youth I sometimes used to smoke roll-ups at parties and I sometimes even bought tobacco so I could make my own and not be cadging from other people all the time, but I never got addicted and so I had no experience I could share about giving up the evil weed. But I do encourage people to be mindful, and so I suggested that she really pay attention to the sensations and mental patterns that arose each time she was smoking a cigarette. It seemed …

Wildmind Meditation News

Oct 23, 2013

Mindfulness benefits overall health

U-T, San Diego: When I observed that the Mayo Clinic Health Letter had devoted an entire special section to mindfulness, I thought, this looks like something to share.

According to the Health Letter, “It was originally conceived as a way to ease suffering and cultivate compassion.” That sentence is derivative of no specific religion or culture. Despite the fact that mindfulness has roots in Buddhism, it is relevant to all religions. As a religious or psychological concept it is the focusing of attention and awareness on the present. “… (R)esearch has found therapy based on mindfulness to be effective, particularly for reducing anxiety…

Read the original article »