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You are browsing all posts tagged with the topic: neuroscience

Wildmind Meditation News

Apr 23, 2014

4 ways mindfulness meditation benefits so many conditions

wildmind meditation newsPsyBlog, Dr Jeremy Dean: Four central components of how mindfulness meditation works, psychological research finds.

With studies pouring in on the benefits of mindfulness, psychologists’ attention is turning to why mindfulness works, and the results are fascinating.

For example, mindfulness meditation has been shown to have therapeutic benefits in depression, anxiety, substance abuse, chronic pain and eating disorders.

Its benefits extend out to physical features like lower blood pressure and lower cortisol levels.

How is it that this type of practice can have these beneficial effects on such a broad range of conditions?

A recent study by Hölzel et al. (2011) finds four central …

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Wildmind Meditation News

Apr 09, 2014

The mainstreaming of mindfulness meditation

wildmind meditation newsFrances Weaver, TheWeek.com: Stressed-out Americans, from war veterans to Google workers, are embracing mindfulness meditation. Does it really work?

Why is mindfulness so popular?
It appeals to people seeking an antidote to life in work-obsessed, tech-saturated, frantically busy Western culture. There is growing scientific evidence that mindfulness meditation has genuine health benefits — and can even alter the structure of the brain, so the technique is drawing some unlikely devotees. Pentagon leaders are experimenting with mindfulness to make soldiers more resilient, while General Mills has installed a meditation room in every building of its Minneapolis campus. Even tech-obsessed Silicon Valley entrepreneurs are using …

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Wildmind Meditation News

Apr 02, 2014

Research method integrates meditation, science

wildmind meditation newsMedical Xpress: Mindfulness is always personal and often spiritual, but the meditation experience does not have to be subjective. Advances in methodology are allowing researchers to integrate mindfulness experiences with brain imaging and neural signal data to form testable hypotheses about the science—and the reported mental health benefits—of the practice.

A team of Brown University researchers, led by junior Juan Santoyo, will present their research approach at 2:45 p.m on Saturday, April 5, 2014, at the 12th Annual International Scientific Conference of the Center for Mindfulness at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. Their methodology employs a structured coding of the reports meditators provide about …

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Rick Hanson PhD

Mar 17, 2014

Wholesome intentions – The neurology of intention

Burning candleOur intentions arise in the brain, are represented in the brain, and are pursued in the brain. Where else?

Therefore, a basic understanding of how intentions work in the brain – and thus in your mind – is a very useful thing to have.

The Executive Functions
The brain is like a committee, with many parts or “members” working together – or at cross purposes! – and the frontal lobes are like the chair of that committee. Or, to use a different metaphor, if the psyche altogether is a vast land, with a capital and many provinces, the frontal lobes are like the city manager of the capital.

But of course that does not mean …

Mark Tillotson

Mar 17, 2014

Athletes using meditation to improve performance

wildmind meditation newsIlene Raymond Rush, The Inquirer: For 15 minutes a day, Tim Frazier, Penn State’s senior point guard, finds a quiet place, switches on a podcast, and meditates. Along with his teammates, Frazier, the team’s all-time leader in assists, has found that practicing mindfulness meditation – focusing on the breath with his eyes closed and becoming aware of his thoughts without judging them – has amped up his performance on the court.

“The game moves so fast, it’s hard to focus on the here and now,” said Frazier, who is pretty fleet of foot himself. “Meditation slows me down [mentally], keeps me more relaxed and more …

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Wildmind Meditation News

Mar 10, 2014

Does meditation really work? Excerpt from Dan Harris’s self-help guide, 10% Happier

wildmind meditation newsParade: In 10% Happier, a self-help guide even skeptics will embrace, ABC News’ Dan Harris crushes stereotypes about meditation and recounts how it slashed his stress and quieted his anxious mind. Read an excerpt below.

Initially I wanted to call this book The Voice in My Head Is an A**hole. However, that title was deemed inappropriate for a man whose day job requires him to abide by FCC decency standards.

It’s true, though. The voice in my head can be a total pill. I’d venture to guess yours can, too. Most of us are so entranced by the nonstop conversation we’re having with ourselves …

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Wildmind Meditation News

Mar 07, 2014

Meditation at work can improve focus, lower stress

wildmind meditation newsKathleen Koster, Employee Benefit News: A new trend in employee coaching and assistance programs applies neuroscience to help employees reduce stress, quit smoking and become more focused and productive in a variety of business environments. Among executives, this type of coaching can increase performance so they can tackle difficult problems while managing employees and leading a company.

“What we found is by assisting the person through a coaching process to be more resilient through neuropsychology, they can focus more mindfully and can make decisions more lucidly that positively problem-solve issues for their team,” explains Justin J. Kennedy, a professor at Monarch University in …

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Wildmind Meditation News

Feb 28, 2014

5 ways meditation gives your brain a boost

wildmind meditation newsDan Harris, ABC News: I never in a million years thought I’d be the type of person who meditates. I’ve had an aversion to all things airy-fairy since age five, when my parents – recovering hippies – sent me to a yoga class for kids. The teacher, who disapproved of the jeans I was wearing, made me strip down and do sun salutations in my tighty-whities.

But then, a few years ago, I heard about an explosion of scientific research suggesting that meditation has an extraordinary range of health benefits. In particular, I found the neuroscience compelling. Studies say you can sculpt your …

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Wildmind Meditation News

Feb 27, 2014

The mental and physical benefits of mindfulness meditation

wildmind meditation newsINSPIRE MALIBU: What began as one of the seven factors of enlightenment according to Buddhist teachings, Mindfulness Meditation is quickly spreading throughout Western society as a way to become more focused and relaxed mentally.

Scientific research has confirmed many of the benefits of Mindfulness including motivation, empathy, and the regulation of emotions. People of all ages and all walks of life can realize the mental and physical benefits of Mindfulness.

What is Mindfulness?
In its simplest terms, Mindfulness involves living in the present moment, and paying special attention to whatever it is you are currently doing. If you’re eating an apple, closely examine …

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Rick Hanson PhD

Feb 26, 2014

Rest in Center

Wood carving Buddha in the trunk of treeGravity and entropy are powerful processes in the natural world. Gravity draws things together, toward a center, while entropy scatters them into disorder. In much the same way, in our own lives, some things bring us to center, while others disturb and disperse us.

In terms of centering, be aware of your whole body as you take a long slow breath, or think of something you’re glad about. You’ll probably feel more at home in yourself, more drawn into your own core rather than feeling like Garfield the cartoon cat, spreadeagled up against a pane of glass.

In terms of feeling scattered, notice what it’s like to …