Shamatha or mindfulness

August 11, 2015

wildmind meditation newsFree Press Journal: Shamatha, or mindfulness, is how we make this mind more stable, more useful. The word “shamatha” in Sanskrit means “peacefully abiding”. Peacefully abiding describes the mind as it naturally is. The word “peace” tells the whole story. The human mind is by nature joyous, calm and very clear. In shamatha meditation we aren’t creating a peaceful state—we’re letting our mind be as it is to begin with. This doesn’t mean that we’re peacefully ignoring things. It means that the mind is able to be with itself without constantly leaving.

In meditation we learn how to calmly abide: we learn how …

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Meditation earning a place in health care

wildmind meditation newsDavid Stroud, Las Vegas Review-Journal: Tina Encheva is sitting in a chair in front of five women, all of them lying on their backs on top of spongy yoga mats. The women’s eyes are closed and their hands rest palms down just above their hearts.

The hypnotic sounds of lilting flutes and humming Tibetan singing bowls are playing over a meditation tape, and Encheva’s delicate voice floats in and out like wind chimes tousled by a soft breeze.

Encheva guides them through the relaxation of their …

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Forgive Yourself

April 23, 2015

SONY DSCMeditation MP3 – The Heart’s Wisdom: Development of Compassion Everyone messes up. Me, you, the neighbors, Mother Teresa, Mahatma Gandhi, King David, the Buddha, everybody.

It’s important to acknowledge mistakes, feel appropriate remorse, and learn from them so they don’t happen again. But most people keep beating themselves up way past the point of usefulness: they’re unfairly self-critical.

Inside the mind are many sub-personalities. For example, one part of me might set the alarm clock for 6 am to get up and exercise . . . and then when it goes off, another part of me could grumble: “Who set the darn clock?” More broadly, there is a kind of inner critic and inner protector … Read more »

So… why do you meditate?

April 22, 2015

wildmind meditation newsMeditation MP3 – Guided Meditations for Calmness, Awareness, and Love (complete album) Reetu Gupta, Huffington Post: This is a question that is posed to me quite regularly, and I can see the skepticism in people’s eyes — the fear of meditation, and the preconceived notions that the only people that meditate are/were Buddha and Mahatma Gandhi. However, I am also regularly asked, “Reetu, why do you always seem at peace? Why do you seem like you are happy from the inside? How are you so centered? So positive?” Well, this is because I meditate.

When our bodies become overworked, the body …

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Dalai Lama wants a dialogue for Syria

September 24, 2013

Harold Mandel, The prolonged Syrian civil war with recent allegations of gas assaults on citizens by Assad and threats of retaliatory bombings by the United States has shaken up the world. It is therefore not surprising that His Holiness the Dalai has joined the search for a lasting peace
in Syria. The Tibet Sun reported on Sept. 21, 2013, “Dalai Lama calls for dialogue on Syria.”

The Dalai Lama has called for peace, democracy and dialogue on Syria. In comments to reporters the Dalai Lama has said it was time for a younger generation to stop fighting the wars of the past…

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Four kinds of peace and how to experience them

August 9, 2013

RickHanson“Peace” can sound merely sentimental or clichéd (“visualize whirled peas”). But deep down, it’s what most of us long for. Consider the proverb: The highest happiness is peace.

Not a peace inside that ignores pain in oneself or others, or is acquired by shutting down. This is a durable peace, a peace you can come home to even if it’s been covered over by fear, frustration, or heartache.

When you’re at peace – when you are engaged with life while also feeling relatively relaxed, calm, and safe – you are protected from stress, your immune system grows stronger, and you become more resilient. Your outlook brightens and you see more opportunities. In relationships, feeling at … Read more »

Cultivate only the path to peace

July 19, 2013

BuddhaThe Buddha was a man on a mission, and very single-minded. He said over and over again that his only interest was in addressing suffering:

Both formerly and now, it is only dukkha that I describe, and the cessation of dukkha.

This word “dukkha” is often rendered as “suffering.” I have no real problem with that translation. It’s accurate. But many people have problems with the word “suffering.” As a friend and I were discussing just the other night, many people don’t recognize the suffering they experience as suffering, and so they don’t think that dukkha applies to them. Often people think of suffering as actual physical pain, or severe deprivation such as starvation, homelessness, … Read more »

“May all beings dwell in peace”: A guided meditation (Day 91)

July 12, 2013

handThis meditation is a recording of a Hangout I did on Google+ with members of Wildmind’s community. It’s an upekkha bhavana meditation, which is not really the “cultivation of equanimity” at all — or at least so I believe. To me, upekkhā is not equanimity. It doesn’t even mean equanimity in its etymological root, but something more like “closely watching.” Upekkhā is when we wish that beings attain the deep peace of awakening through accepting impermanence, or the arising and passing of things, or that everything changes (the exact words don’t matter much).

We are of course seeking the peace of awakening ourselves, and so at the beginning of this sit I encourage you to … Read more »

Five remembrances for deep peace (Day 90)

July 11, 2013

100 Days of LovingkindnessIn learning to experience deep peace in the face of impermanence, we need to consider not just our inner experience, as I did yesterday, but our very lives, and the lives of those around us. Life is short; we all face loss.

These things aren’t really different from what I was discussing yesterday, since it’s our inner feelings about changes in the world that we largely have to deal with, but the same situations can be looked at from different perspectives. When we’re actually experiencing loss, instability, and change, we can work on accepting the the feelings that arise with equanimity. But we can also prepare ourselves philosophically for painful changes that may happen in … Read more »

Indian meditation lends spiritual touch to Africa’s golden jubilee

Bella Jaisinghani, The Times of India: There was an Indian touch to the 50th anniversary celebration of the African Union.

Last week, 23 countries came together to celebrate the golden jubilee with a spiritual quotient.

Around 10,000 people of all races and religions joined an online meditation ‘I Meditate Africa’ conducted by Sri Sri Ravi Shankar, founder of the Art of Living.

People of all age, races and religions gathered at different centres in these 23 countries to meditate for an Africa free of violence and stress.

The campaign started with 2,800 students meditating for peace in the city of Soweto, Johannesburg, the home of…

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