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You are browsing all posts tagged with the topic: Richard Davidson

Wildmind Meditation News

Jun 23, 2010

The power of meditation (audio)

yogaMillions of Americans practice some form of meditation to promote relaxation and reduce stress. But claims for greater health benefits are in need of further study. The power of meditation.

Guests
Josephine Briggs: researcher, physician and director of the National Institutes of Health’s National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine.

Jonathan Foust: senior teacher, the Insight Meditation Community of Washington, and former president of the Kripalu Center for Yoga and Health.

Richard Davidson: director, Waisman Laboratory for Brain Imaging and Behavior and the Center for Investigating Healthy Minds, University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Listen

The Diane Rehm Show is produced by member-supported WAMU 88.5 in Washington DC.

Wildmind Meditation News

May 21, 2010

Investigating the Buddhist mindset

Does the Dalai Lama’s support for a ‘centre for investigating healthy minds’ compromise its scientific respectability?

At a time when the relationship between science and spirit seems characterised by mutual suspicion, common ground for enquiry is all the more refreshing. Like at last Sunday’s opening of the University of Wisconsin’s centre for investigating healthy minds, where the Dalai Lama shared a platform with the new centre’s director, Professor Richard Davidson.

The department is a hub of expertise in what is being called “contemplative neuroscience”, and a natural extension of Davidson’s ongoing quest to discover how various forms of meditation impact the brain. Among his discoveries so far: learning mindfulness skills is associated with greater, sustained …

Wildmind Meditation News

May 18, 2010

Dalai Lama warns of being distorted by ignorance

The Dalai Lama brought his message of compassion, empathy and oneness to Madison on Sunday afternoon, mixing it with levity and tales of sibling rivalry with his brother, all while sitting crosslegged in his chair and wearing a red Wisconsin baseball cap.

A human being’s “basic nature is pure,” and “everyone experiences positive and negative emotions,” but there is the possibility of the mind being distorted by ignorance, he told the crowd of about 1,100 people in the Overture Center’s Capitol Theater.

Nobel Peace Prize winner Tenzin Gyatso, the 14th Dalai Lama of Tibet, was in town to participate in an hourlong “dialogue” with UW-Madison neuroscientist Richard Davidson, founder of the Center for Investigating Healthy …

Wildmind Meditation News

May 18, 2010

Slide show: Dalai Lama visit

When the University of Wisconsin–Madison’s Center for Investigating Healthy Minds held grand-opening events May 15-16, a familiar guest was on hand to celebrate the occasion. As he has a number of times — most recently in 2007 — His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama traveled to Madison to continue ongoing work with the new center’s director, Richard Davidson, a UW–Madison professor of psychology and psychiatry, who also directs the Waisman Laboratory for Brain Imaging and Behavior. Davidson, who has studied Tibetan monks to explore how meditation affects the brain, established the new center to investigate healthy qualities of the mind and how to cultivate those qualities in children and adults. The weekend’s events …

Vishvapani

Sep 11, 2009

The technology of happiness

This geodesic sensor net containing 256 electrodes picks up electrical impulses from numerous parts of the brain when placed on a subject's head. For years westerners have assumed that Buddhists must be a miserable lot: their teachings dwell so much on suffering. But recent scientific research suggests what Buddhists have believed all along. Buddhism — or at least Buddhist meditation — leads to happiness.

Media headlines in the last few years have trumpeted new research into the effects of meditation on brain activity, behavior and even resistance to disease. The findings are still provisional, but as the philosopher Owen Flanagan commented in New Scientist magazine: “The most reasonable hypothesis is that there’s something about conscientious …

Bodhipaksa

Jul 17, 2009

The happiest man in the world

The New York Times today has an article by Daniel Goleman, most famous for his work, Emotional Intelligence, but who has also been involved with His Holiness the Dalai Lama’s Mind and Life conferences and with Dr. Richard Davidson’s research into the effects of meditation on the brain. He writes about Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche, who has apparently been described as the happiest man in the world. Usually I’ve seen that title reserved for another meditator, Matthieu Ricard, but maybe there’s been some kind of world championship laugh-off that I missed. Anyway, it’s an interesting article, even if most of the information is about studies published some years ago.

I recently spent an evening with Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche, the Tibetan

Bodhipaksa

May 16, 2007

The Dalai Lama: “If you want others to be happy, practice compassion. If you want to be happy, practice compassion.”

While it’s quite clear that others may benefit from our compassionate activity, the second part of His Holiness’s observation flies in the face of an assumption that is, for most of us, extremely deep-rooted: that is, the assumption that my individual welfare is best served if I primarily focus on my interests.

But recent scientific research on happiness and brain function suggests that we do help ourselves — by becoming happier — when we help others.

Time magazine recently named Professor Davidson of the University of Wisconsin, Madison, as one of the world’s 100 most influential thinkers. For years Davidson has been researching happiness, sometimes studying Buddhist monks in his lab, …

Bodhipaksa

Feb 23, 2007

Destructive Emotions: A Scientific Dialogue With the Dalai Lama, by Daniel Goleman

book cover Available from Amazon.com and Amazon.co.uk.

Don’t be put off by the title: this book should really be called “Positive emotions and how to develop them.”

A new book from Buddhist author Daniel Goleman (“Emotional Intelligence”) is always going to be an exciting event. More so in this case because of the extraordinary background out of which the book emerged.

The Dalai Lama, a fan of science since boyhood (he famously enjoys tinkering with watches and has been known to rubberneck when passing electronics stores) annually gathers the world’s eminent minds in order to educate himself about the latest scientific findings and in