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Sit : Love : Give

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You are browsing all posts tagged with the topic: right livelihood

Wildmind Meditation News

Nov 12, 2012

The ROI of practicing mindfulness at work

Michael Carroll: Mindfulness meditation, at first glance, provokes a reasonable question: “why on earth would I, or anyone for that matter, sit still doing nothing for long periods of time?”

We can take two basic approaches to answering this question: we sit still for long periods of time in order to get a lot of benefits — to get a return on our investment — an ROI.

Or we sit still for long periods of time in order to achieve nothing.

Let’s take the ROI approach first. Recent scientific research seems to document that mindfulness meditation produces a wide range of positive results …

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Wildmind Meditation News

Nov 11, 2012

Ignoring the inbox – a new morning mantra

Eli Greenblat, The Age: If you, like most office workers, open your email first thing in the morning, then you might be setting yourself up for a horrible day and wasting hundreds of hours a year.

The work email inbox is a “pandora’s box” of nitty-gritty detail, gossip and distractions that are best dealt with later in the morning, and pressing the “send receive” button as soon as you slouch in your seat is the worst way to start your day.

These are the somewhat controversial views of Danish organisational behavioural expert and corporate consultant Rasmus Hougaard, who has taken his new way …

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Bodhipaksa

Sep 24, 2012

A new arrival…

This handsome fellow just arrived in our office. We sell this Buddha statue, and others, plus a full range of meditation supplies, in our online store.

Your making a purchase helps us to keep this site running.

Kulananda

Sep 04, 2012

Ten tips for mindful working

kulananda

  • If you walk to the bus stop, Tube or train station, turn off your phone. Feel your feet on the ground and the movement in your legs and hips. Notice how you’re breathing.
  • If you drive to work, take a few moments when you first get into your car just to notice your breath and your body.
  • As you sit at your desk or workstation, take a few moments from time to time to tune in to your body sensations. Notice any tension that might be there and breathe into it – softening and easing.
  • When you have a break, instead of reading the paper or searching on the internet, get away from
  • Wildmind Meditation News

    Sep 04, 2012

    Mindfulness: helping employees to deal with stress

    Occupational Health: Occupational health teams should be encouraged to get behind the concept of mindfulness, an alternative approach to helping staff cope with pressure experienced in the workplace, says Suzy Bashford.

    The UK’s first Mindfulness at Work conference, organised by Mindfulnet, took place in February this year. The message from the event was that mindfulness, a meditation-based approach to stress management, can provide an antidote to the relentless pressure and information overload that exists in many UK businesses. It can also help employees thrive under stress and relate better to colleagues or clients.

    The growing body of evidence in this area (there are …

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    Wildmind Meditation News

    Aug 22, 2012

    Be more mindful for a better workplace

    Jen Weigel, Chicago Tribune: Can you be a success in the world of business and still be mindful? What exactly does it mean to be “mindful” anyway? According to Mirabai Bush, one of the creators of a mindfulness course developed for Google employees called “Search Inside Yourself,” you will be more productive and motivated if you use respect, compassion and generosity in the workplace.

    “Mindfulness has to do with paying attention to what’s happening in the moment without judgment,” said Bush. “Sometimes people think being mindful means being slow — it’s not about being slow, it’s about being slow enough that you can …

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    Wildmind Meditation News

    May 19, 2011

    New in our online store

    Bodhipaksa

    Feb 11, 2011

    “Buddha Bob”: turning his life around, one bead at a time

    buddha headOne of the most frustrating things in my life is that for the last few months, because of a change in my wife’s work schedule, I haven’t been able to get up to the prison I’ve been teaching in for the last seven years. I miss the guys there. I regard them as part of my “sangha” (spiritual community). I have great respect for them as spiritual practitioners because of the sheer effort they have to make in order to remain sane and balanced in a very challenging environment. Not only do they stay sane and balanced, but some of them bring about huge changes in their lives. …

    Wildmind Meditation News

    Jun 26, 2010

    Norman Fischer on meditation

    norman fischerA video transcript.

    KATE OLSON, correspondent: It’s early morning along the Pacific Coast. Norman Fischer, a Buddhist priest who’s been teaching meditation for over three decades, opens a day of silent meditation for practitioners of Zen Buddhism.

    NORMAN FISCHER (speaking to group): Thank you all for coming, and I hope everybody has a good day, a peaceful day, a day in which whatever needs to arise in your heart will do so.

    OLSON: Other days, Fischer is at Google in Silicon Valley offering the same meditation practice to employees participating in a class called “Search Inside Yourself.”

    FISCHER (speaking to class): Lengthen the spine, open the chest, and let your body pull itself …

    Bodhipaksa

    Jun 14, 2010

    Compassionate commerce

    begging monksIn the days of the Buddha, people generously supported monks and nuns. They gave them food, clothing, medicine, land, and buildings. And the monks and nuns taught — freely. Many people nowadays, thinking back to that arrangement, say “meditation should be free” or “it’s wrong to charge for Dharma (Buddhism) classes.”

    Of course the Dharma was never free! It was free at the point of delivery, in that monks didn’t charge for classes. But enough people supported the monastics for them to be able to do that. It’s that half of the equation that gets forgotten when people are saying, in effect, “give me meditation — and don’t charge