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You are browsing all posts tagged with the topic: Robert Wright

Bodhipaksa

Dec 31, 2012

Is meditation supposed to make you happier?

Buddha statue at wat phasawangbun temple, ThailandRobert Wright, a senior editor at The Atlantic and the author, most recently, of The Evolution of God, writes from time to time about his meditation practice, especially when he’s going on retreat, for example here and (most recently) here.

Wright has found, as many people have, that meditation improves his life. He talks of the “sharp, even cold, clarity” he gains from sitting, as well as the “warm and fuzzy” feelings that arise from that clarity.

Surprisingly, to my mind, Wright finds himself in the position of having to “defend” finding that meditation makes him happier. One commenter said, for example:

Well, if you’re talking about

Wildmind Meditation News

Dec 30, 2012

Should Buddhist meditation make you happy?

Robert Wright, The Atlantic: In Early December, right before I headed off for a one-week silent meditation retreat, I encouraged readers to leave comments or questions about meditation that I could respond to upon returning.

A commenter named Jon Johanning obliged: “If you’re talking about Buddhist meditation, I’m sorry to say that you’re missing the whole point,” he wrote. He was referring to my having noted that on a previous meditation retreat I felt lousy after the first few days but great later on. He continued, “Whether you feel ‘good’ or ‘bad’ or ‘bored’ or ‘fuzzy’ or ‘ecstatic’ or anything else in particular …

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Wildmind Meditation News

Dec 11, 2012

Retreating into meditation

Robert Wright, the Atlantic: At the moment this post is published–Monday evening–I’m probably miserable. But I can’t say for sure.
Monday is the third full day of a week-long silent meditation retreat I’m attending. Since being on a silent meditation retreat means cutting off all contact with the world, I had to write this post before the retreat started. But since this isn’t my first week-long meditation retreat, I can with some confidence predict how I’ll be feeling three days into it. And it’s not a great feeling.

As I put it a couple of years ago in a piece I wrote about …

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Wildmind Meditation News

Jun 27, 2010

That misery called meditation

imsRobert Wright, the New York Times online columnist and author of The Evolution of God, is pretty much what you’d call a cynic. That’s why I was surprised when he spoke with such reverence of the period he spent meditating at a silent Buddhist retreat. “When I came out, I was quite different,” he told me. “It was one of the best things I’d ever done.”

What could bring such joy to a cynic? The way to find out was to go to Barre, Mass., home of the Insight Meditation Society, where Wright went on his pilgrimage many years ago. Founded in the 1970s by a group of Westerners who had spent …

Bodhipaksa

Sep 03, 2009

Meditation zeitgeist, September 3, 2009

ZeitgeistA not-entirely-random selection of blog posts on meditation.

The amazing Buddhist Geeks have an interview with Karma Kagyu teacher, Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche.

He starts off by telling us about how he got into formal Buddhist practice, at the tender age of 9. He also shares some of his initial challenges with anxiety, and how he was able to work with it on his first 3-year retreat.

Robert Wright, author of The Moral Animal and, most recently, The Evolution of God, wrote about his experiments with meditation in a New York Times blog post that was much discussed in the blogosphere. We was just about to go on a meditation retreat at the …