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You are browsing all posts tagged with the topic: technology

Bodhipaksa

Jun 22, 2013

The Glass Buddha Project: an update

glass buddha projectWow! Our Glass Buddha Project fundraiser is now 118% funded in just three days. Originally I’d allowed 21 days for the fundraising, and aimed to bring in $1633, but we currently have $1933 donated, and 18 days to go. Wow!

I’d never have dreamed that we would exceed our fundraising goal in such a short period of time. Being over-funded is actually really great, because I’d forgotten to factor in Indiegogo’s fees, and I also have to make a trip to NYC to pick up glass. All those expenses are now covered, and since Wildmind is only just scraping by financially at the moment I’m relieved that I don’t have …

Bodhipaksa

Jun 21, 2013

Meet Wildmind’s iPhone app!

mzl.gcljpckd.320x480-75Wildmind’s first iPhone app is now available for download from iTunes. And it’s FREE!

This is our first attempt at an app, and it’s very simple.

It simply takes the blog and presents the most recent posts from the news, on practice, reviews, and quote of the month categories.

So it’s simple, but it’s a nice way to read the blog.

And I like to think it looks nice, although I did the graphic design, so I’m biased.

The app was put together for us by Tony Paine, who is a software engineer in the Bay Area, and also a Buddhist who used to be part of the sangha at Aryaloka, my local Dharma …

Bodhipaksa

Jun 18, 2013

The Glass Buddha Project: Technology + Mindfulness = Awesome

Blue glass buddha statue on a yellow background

I’m fascinated by technology and committed to exploring ways to teach meditation more effectively. I want to use technology to reach as many people as possible in our global village, so that we can spread the benefits of mindfulness and compassion.

An amazing opportunity has come up. I won a competition and was selected by Google to explore the potential of Google Glass, the new wearable computing gizmo with a head-mounted display, voice recognition, and audio and visual recording capabilities.

This could be an amazing tool for teaching.

  • I’d be able to record audio and video of my classes more easily.
  • I’d be able to open

Bodhipaksa

Mar 27, 2013

Becoming a Google Glass Explorer

google glass

I’m now officially a Google Glass Explorer (or #GlassExplorer)!

You’ve probably heard of Google’s “Project Glass.” It’s the virtual reality display that sits on your face like glasses, and allows you to receive and send messages, or to make video or audio recordings.

Here’s a video, giving you a first person view of “what it’s like.”

I’ve been officially selected to try out Google glass, based on a submission I wrote for their competition.

On Feb 26 I wrote:

#ifihadglass it would be to use it as a mindfulness teaching tool, plucking moments of beauty from ordinary life, creating full-immersion audiovisual haikus to share with the world, showing how

Bodhipaksa

Mar 09, 2013

What are our screens doing to us?

Watch this video. And ask others to watch it.

Of course in a sense our screens are doing no more to us than presenting us with sensory input, or opportunities for sensory input. And so the question is more “what are we doing with our screens,” or even “what are we losing while we are attending to the input from our screens.”

In my case, one of the significant things I’m losing is the quality and quantity of my sleep. I stay up too late reading. I always (thanks to the Zite and Pocket apps) have plenty of thought-provoking articles queued up, ready to read. As a consequence I end up being chronically sleep-deprived. I’m an …

Bodhipaksa

Feb 27, 2013

Project Glass as a tool for Awakening

glass_photos3As you probably know, I’m keen on seeing how technology can be harnessed to enhance spiritual practice in the modern world. Wildmind was the first website, as far as I’m aware, to attempt to offer a systematic and comprehensive guide to meditation. We also were ahead of the game in offering online courses in meditation, way back in 2002. And our Google+ Community is an outstanding example of how the internet can be used to create a supportive and encouraging spiritual community.

So I was very interested to hear that Google was looking for people to explore their new virtual reality glasses, Project Glass. Here’s the gist:

We’re looking for bold, creative individuals

Bodhipaksa

Feb 21, 2013

Wildmind in Zite’s Top Articles of 2012

Zite is an app that presents you with an ever-changing personalized magazine on your iDevice, Android, or Windows mobile device. Zite is, as they say, “all your interests in one place.” (“Zite” is a play on “zeitgeist” — the spirit of the times.)

I’m a Zite user, and I have to say I’m very impressed with some of the gems that it finds for me — truly fascinating articles about science, culture, and philosophy for the most part (although if you’re into sports, or television, or celebrities, your own version of Zite would include those). Bob Tedeschi of the New York Times said, “This app is the closest thing to the perfect magazine.” I have to agree.

Now, Zites users can …

Bodhipaksa

Jan 06, 2013

Mindfulness in the 21st century

phone etiquette

This is an excellent phone etiquette idea. People often want to spend more time texting the people they’re not with than paying attention to the people they are with, and in doing so they deprive themselves of the opportunity to make rich emotional connections with others.

We need to develop ways, like this one, of dealing with our addictions to technology and to multitasking. Otherwise we risk becoming road-kill on the information superhighway.

Bodhipaksa

Dec 19, 2012

Meditation autocorrect disaster

Wildmind Meditation News

Nov 11, 2012

Ignoring the inbox – a new morning mantra

Eli Greenblat, The Age: If you, like most office workers, open your email first thing in the morning, then you might be setting yourself up for a horrible day and wasting hundreds of hours a year.

The work email inbox is a “pandora’s box” of nitty-gritty detail, gossip and distractions that are best dealt with later in the morning, and pressing the “send receive” button as soon as you slouch in your seat is the worst way to start your day.

These are the somewhat controversial views of Danish organisational behavioural expert and corporate consultant Rasmus Hougaard, who has taken his new way …

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