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You are browsing all posts tagged with the topic: technology

Wildmind Meditation News

Nov 04, 2011

Turn On, Tune In, Zone Out: A review of Deepak Chopra’s new game, Leela

Blanca Myers: Leela, Deepak Chopra’s debut game for Xbox 360 Kinect and Wii, is part relaxation mechanism, part new-age stoner candy.

The game, which comes out next week, playfully steers you toward the gap between the conscious and the subconscious. There are different levels of gameplay — some help you tune each of your seven chakras, others guide you through meditation and relaxation exercises.

Chopra, a renowned figure in mind-body medicine, says Leela was inspired partly by his studies of spirituality, and partly by his own experimentation with psychedelics decades ago as a medical student. He teamed up with the game publisher THQ and a …

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Wildmind Meditation News

Jun 07, 2011

Wildmind blog now available on Amazon Kindle

Wildmind’s blog is now available on your Amazon Kindle.

If you have a Kindle you can subscribe from the Kindle Store. The subscription is free for the first two weeks, and $1.99 per month thereafter. Amazon does not make it possible for us to offer the blog on the Kindle at no cost.

If you’re not sure what a Kindle is, it’s Amazon’s nifty ebook reader. It uses a revolutionary electronic ink screen, so it’s possible to read it even in bright sunlight. In fact the brighter the light, the easier it is to read. And the batteries last for a week or more, so it’s perfect for taking …

Wildmind Meditation News

Jun 15, 2010

Religion, iPhone mingle with spiritual apps

The Rev. Roderick Belin of Kairos Community AME Church in NashvilleBefore the Rev. Roderick Belin gets ready to preach, he grabs his Bible and his iPhone.

He uses the mobile device to look up Bible verses and theology texts and to alert him if his sermon runs too long. If he forgets the words to a hymn, his phone can save the day. That’s what happened on a recent Sunday.

“I was singing ‘His Eye is on the Sparrow,’ and I had the first verse but wasn’t too sure about the second,” said Belin, pastor of Kairos Community AME Church. A few taps …

Justin Whitaker

Sep 24, 2009

Awareness in our technological world

monk with laptopTechnology brings a world of spiritual knowledge to our fingertips. But immersing ourselves in a world of gadgets may also distance us from more authentic connections with teachers, family, and friends. Guest blogger Justin Whitaker takes a look at the double-edged sword of our hyper-connected world.

Since you are reading this, presumably on a computer or other high-tech device, you owe a thing or two to technology. Nearly all of us in the Western world and a fast-growing number in the East live in a world molded and directed by technology. We have lived amidst changes that could scarcely be imagined just fifty years ago. We wake up, push a button or …

Bodhipaksa

Sep 21, 2009

John Dewey: “The self is not something ready-made, but something in continuous formation through choice of action.”

John DeweyDewey’s saying echoes Buddhist notions of impermanence and not-self. Bodhipaksa points out that the Buddhist position is not merely descriptive of how things are. Rather it amounts to a technology of happiness — a set of perspectives and tools that allows us to create more deeply fulfilling lives.

One of the most crippling — and often unacknowledged — beliefs we can have in that the self is something fixed and unchanging. When we have the idea that our personalities are set like words carved in stone the possibility of change is closed off to us.

A mountaineering friend of mine once commented that when coming down a hill you were faced with innumerable choices about …

Vishvapani

Sep 11, 2009

The technology of happiness

This geodesic sensor net containing 256 electrodes picks up electrical impulses from numerous parts of the brain when placed on a subject's head. For years westerners have assumed that Buddhists must be a miserable lot: their teachings dwell so much on suffering. But recent scientific research suggests what Buddhists have believed all along. Buddhism — or at least Buddhist meditation — leads to happiness.

Media headlines in the last few years have trumpeted new research into the effects of meditation on brain activity, behavior and even resistance to disease. The findings are still provisional, but as the philosopher Owen Flanagan commented in New Scientist magazine: “The most reasonable hypothesis is that there’s something about conscientious …

Bodhipaksa

Sep 03, 2009

Meditation zeitgeist, September 3, 2009

ZeitgeistA not-entirely-random selection of blog posts on meditation.

The amazing Buddhist Geeks have an interview with Karma Kagyu teacher, Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche.

He starts off by telling us about how he got into formal Buddhist practice, at the tender age of 9. He also shares some of his initial challenges with anxiety, and how he was able to work with it on his first 3-year retreat.

Robert Wright, author of The Moral Animal and, most recently, The Evolution of God, wrote about his experiments with meditation in a New York Times blog post that was much discussed in the blogosphere. We was just about to go on a meditation retreat at the …

Bodhipaksa

Aug 07, 2009

Meditation zeitgeist, August 7, 2009

ZeitgeistA not-entirely-random selection of blog posts on meditation.

Eileen at Soul Sleuthing gives a very honest account of what her experience of meditation is, complete with wandering thoughts (and wandering pets).

The Rev. Danny Fisher (no stranger to Meditation Zeitgeist) has a new article on his friend’s site, Amyknowsbest. It’s a mindfulness meditation exercise.

Lama Surya Das has an article on technology and spirituality, called The Tao of Twitter, in which he discusses matters from texting prayers to being reincarnated as a computer.

If that seems a little “out there,” Will Buckingham writes about how meditation is a very practical activity. Amongst many other interesting things, he says:

As I was sitting this morning, it

Bodhipaksa

Jun 18, 2009

Meditation Zeitgeist, June 18, 2009

ZeitgeistA not-entirely-random selection of blog posts on meditation.

Justin Whitaker, Buddhist scholar and blogger, has a nice review of Bodhipaksa’s latest audiobook, Still The Mind. Justin was a student of Bodhipaksa’s many years ago, but he’s the very soul of integrity and we don’t think his review is hyped in any way.

Via Shambhala Sun Space comes this delightfully quirky story of the launch of the “Buddha phone” in Japan; a single tap of the phone’s dedicated lotus-leaf button will load a private, customizable, animated altar.

From the Buddhist Military Sangha blog comes a great video by a Navy Seal, explaining how Zen practice has helped his life and career. Rather bizarrely, …

Bodhipaksa

Jun 18, 2009

Stop samsara, I want to get off!

Iphone with buddhaFinding contentment in a materialistic world, or, how our author didn’t buy an iPhone, and then did, and then didn’t again.

I admit I struggle with an attraction to shiny objects, and in my mind nothing shines with quite the seductive luster of a latest-model iPhone. When I first heard that the iPhone was in the works, about three years ago, I was filled with what can only be called technolust — a powerful desire to own the latest shiny toy (which at that point was not even available.

So what’s the big deal, you may ask. Isn’t it normal to be full of craving for something you want? And isn’t craving an iPhone …