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You are browsing all posts tagged with the topic: video games

Wildmind Meditation News

Nov 04, 2011

Turn On, Tune In, Zone Out: A review of Deepak Chopra’s new game, Leela

Blanca Myers: Leela, Deepak Chopra’s debut game for Xbox 360 Kinect and Wii, is part relaxation mechanism, part new-age stoner candy.

The game, which comes out next week, playfully steers you toward the gap between the conscious and the subconscious. There are different levels of gameplay — some help you tune each of your seven chakras, others guide you through meditation and relaxation exercises.

Chopra, a renowned figure in mind-body medicine, says Leela was inspired partly by his studies of spirituality, and partly by his own experimentation with psychedelics decades ago as a medical student. He teamed up with the game publisher THQ and a …

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Wildmind Meditation News

Jul 26, 2011

Chakra and awe: A bizarre trip through Deepak Chopra’s “Leela”

Alex Navarro (Giant Bomb): THQ’s meditative software…thing is not really a game, but supposedly it’ll help you get in greater tune with your chakras. So there’s that.

One title in THQ’s lineup of casual games left me scratching my head. It’s a title that that, in theory, certainly would seem to have an audience, but the question of whether that audience would actually own and/or use a gaming console is, at this point in time, a relatively untested theory. THQ seems to believe there is an audience for it, otherwise they wouldn’t be producing the game. And yet, as I went through the motions of this peculiar game…

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Wildmind Meditation News

Jul 04, 2010

Controlling pain with alternative remedies

meditationMeditation, Alexander Technique exercises and video games are some of the complementary therapies being practiced to keep pain in check.

Beyond drugs, beyond exercise, beyond simply getting better are other ways to control pain. Typically referred to as complementary alternative medicine, many people consider their use to be common sense.

  • At the top of the list is the ancient practice of meditation. A number of studies suggest it can help people feel less pain. In one study, published in May in the journal Pain, people who had some experience with mindful meditation were subjected to bouts of pain. Those who had more experience with meditating showed less activity in certain parts of their