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You are browsing all posts tagged with the topic: Western Buddhism

Wildmind Meditation News

Jun 20, 2010

Shaolin Temple’s real kick is inner peace

Western monkClosely aligned with the temple in China, the shrine in Sherman Oaks focuses on philosophy and meditation.

China’s world-famous Shaolin Temple gained prominence among many Americans with the release of the 1980s martial arts movie of the same name. An updated version of the film, loved by fans for the riveting kung fu stunts of the temple’s legendary fighting monks, is in the works. And in recent weeks, Hollywood’s remake of “The Karate Kid” has topped the box office, wowing audiences with its seemingly magical martial arts techniques.

But while kung fu continues to make a splash on the big screen, members of the Shaolin Buddhist Temple in Sherman Oaks are …

Wildmind Meditation News

May 26, 2010

Buddhist shrine unveiled at Ynys Graianog, Criccieth

A Buddhist teacher travelled from Criccieth to Kathmandu to find sacred figures for her shrine room.

Now Lama Shenpen Hookham is hoping local people who are interested in meditation will visit her retreat at Ynys Graianog where the shrine room has been enlarged to accommodate more people.

“We wanted a Buddhist image in the proper proportions and covered in gold,” she explained. “Having images is important as a kind of focus for the sacred space.

“I went out to Kathmandu this winter where there are these amazing shops full of exquisite images. I chose the ones which spoke most to me.”

Pride of place goes to a statue of Guru Rinpoche, the Indian man who first took …

Pam Dodd

Mar 22, 2010

“Living Ethically: Advice from Nagarjuna’s Precious Garland,” by Sangharakshita

Living Ethically: Advice from Nagarjuna’s Precious Garland, by SangharakshitaBuddhism’s ethical code was formulated in Iron-Age India. How relevant is it for people living today? Pam Dodd, our guest reviewer, delves into Sangharakshita’s book on Living Ethically.

Title: Living Ethically: Advice from Nagarjuna’s Precious Garland
Author: Sangharakshita
Publisher: Windhorse Publications
ISBN: 9781899579860
Available from: Windhorse (UK) Amazon.com.

Living Ethically is the first of two planned volumes by British Buddhist scholar and former monk Sangharakshita on Nagarjuna’s Precious Garland of Advice for a King (Ratnamala). This first book follows a beautifully laid out interpretive journey through the Precious Garland’s rich array of common and uncommon directives for leading an ethical life.

These lessons will be a welcome addition to any …

Bodhipaksa

Jul 21, 2009

Meditation zeitgeist, July 21, 2009

ZeitgeistA not-entirely-random selection of blog posts on meditation.

The ever-diligent Rev. Danny Fisher spotted an article in the Guardian that I’d missed, and published an extract. The original article was about a talk given in London by Joseph Goldstein. The author, Naseem Khan, as well as highlighting Goldstein’s wisdom, also weaves in some reflections on multiculturalism.

C4chaos has a detailed account of how meditation has helped with migraines. He outlines a four-step process. Normally in these zeitgeist articles we don’t post much detail, but in this case I’ll make an exception:

Step 1: Take a comfortable sitting position with spine straight (I do mine in half lotus posture. But sitting in a comfortable chair

William Harryman

Apr 16, 2009

“The Essential Sangharakshita” by Urgyen Sangharakshita, edited by Karen Stout

The Essential SangharakshitaBuddhism has always adapted its presentation as it has taken root in new cultures, finding new idioms and new forms that resonate with the host culture.

For the last fifty years, Sangharakshita has been one of the teachers most involved in helping Buddhist to find expression in the west. William Harryman takes a look at Wisdom’s new survey of 50 years of teaching.

Discussing the movement of Buddhism to the West seems to be a hot topic in the Buddhist magazines, blogs, and online communities. There seems to be a lot of concern as to how Buddhism will survive the translation from Eastern culture to Western culture. Many traditional Eastern teachers, especially Theravadin, and …

Rev. Danny Fisher

Mar 23, 2009

The Best of Inquiring Mind: 25 Years of Dharma, Drama, and Uncommon Insight

Best of Inquiring MindAs the exceptional, essential new anthology The Best of Inquiring Mind: 25 Years of Dharma, Drama, and Uncommon Insight underscores for us, Inquiring Mind journal has been both a vital and heroic effort in English-language Buddhist media.

At a quarter-century in age, the biannual is one of the longest-standing publications for Dharma practitioners in North America—a survivor, a keeper, and an example. As publisher Alan Novidor so aptly puts it in his preface, the journal is generally regarded as “beautiful, honest, provocative, and simply presented.”

Co-founded and co-edited by Barbara Gates and Wes Nisker (who also put the book together), Inquiring Mind is staffed by six part-timers and a lot of …

Tejananda

Feb 27, 2009

“Never Turn Away: The Buddhist Path Beyond Hope and Fear” by Rigdzin Shikpo

Never Turn Away, by Rigdzin ShikpoTejananda, Buddhist practitioner, meditation teacher, and author of The Buddhist Path to Awakening, gives an overview of a new, fresh approach to translating the wisdom of Tibetan Buddhism into a western idiom.

Rigdzin Shikpo (Michael Hookham) was one of the earliest Western students of Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche. Trungpa, who died in 1987, was a brilliant yet controversial figure. But whatever his flaws, he was undoubtedly one of the key figures in transmitting and translating Tibetan Buddhism for the western world: not so much translating in the linguistic sense as being prepared to take risks in creating new forms and expressions out of the 1000 year old Kagyu tradition in …

Suriyavamsa

Sep 22, 2008

“Warrior King of Shambhala: Remembering Chogyam Trungpa,” by Jeremy Hayward

warrior king of shambhalaChogyam Trungpa Rinpoche was a charismatic, brilliant teacher whose drinking and sexual dalliances left a problematic legacy. Suriyavamsa reviews a new book that appreciates Trungpa’s monumental contribution to western Buddhism but doesn’t shy away from describing his shortcomings.

The Tibetan teacher Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche stands out among the pioneers of Western Buddhism as a colorful and dangerous force making a huge impact on the Buddhism we find here today.

His short life was characterized by a tension between his thorough engagement with traditional Buddhist practice and his breaking with this traditional form in an often outrageous way. Both facets were part of his traditional Tibetan upbringing — a meticulous monastic training in Buddhist …

Nagapriya

Sep 01, 2008

“Money, Sex, War, Karma: Notes for a Buddhist Revolution,” by David Loy

money sex war karmaBuddhist author and scholar Nagapriya reviews a new book that takes a passionate and bold survey of Buddhism, how it interacts with the west, and what that means for us individually.

David Loy has established a formidable reputation as a serious Buddhist thinker able to tackle the big issues. He is especially concerned with the encounter between Buddhist ideas and practices and the contemporary world, an encounter that he believes has the potential to be mutually beneficial. In his words, “Buddhism and the West need each other.” (p.3) He adopts a broadly existential approach to interpreting Buddhism through an analysis of what he calls “lack” — an idea that derives from the …