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Wildmind is an online meditation center — a place where anyone can learn to meditate or deepen their existing practice.

Wildmind is a Community-Supported Meditation Initiative. We're supported by a community of sponsors, who receive many benefits, including:

  • Access to all of Bodhipaksa's past online meditation courses, of which there are currently around 30.
  • A monthly newsletter that's just for sponsors, containing an exclusive article and a meditation download.
  • An online sponsors' forum where you can share your practice and get feedback, support, and encouragement.
  • Free access to any new meditation courses that Bodhipaksa develops through Wildmind.

You can get all this by sponsoring one or more Community Shares. These are only $6 a month each, which makes the benefits you receive a tremendous bargain. More than 90% of our Community Shares are already sponsored. Make sure you don't miss out by sponsoring one or more shares today!

Check Out Recent Posts on Wildmind's Blog

Person kneeling in front of a giant Buddha statue in a temple

Mudita is not “sympathetic joy”

By Bodhipaksa

This is an extract from the introduction to my current course on Mudita, which is part of a longer series of teachings on the brahma-viharas — also known as the “immeasurables.” The third of the Brahmaviharas, after lovingkindness and compassion, is mudita. Mudita is usually translated as sympathetic or empathetic joy, and is described as…

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A post-it note on a wooden desk, reading "sorry"

Forgiveness as a practice of compassion

By Bodhipaksa

One of the emotional drivers of cruel and unkind behavior is resentment. Resentment is when we hold onto past hurt, locking ourselves into a pattern of blame. Unable to let go of the past we keep bringing up a memory of someone hurting us, betraying us, or failing to protect us. Every time we do…

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concentric circles of bright colors

The importance of emulation in compassion

By Bodhipaksa

In some versions of the  lovingkindness (metta bhavana) meditation practice we start by calling to mind a benefactor — someone who has been kind to us. The significance of this is that we’re remembering what kindness is like, connecting experientially with it so that we remember what it’s like to be looked at with kind…

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Why it’s important to meditate every day

By Bodhipaksa

I used to envy people who were able to meditate every day, because it was something I struggled with. Certain people just didn’t have a problem with meditating daily, but I found it hard. I’d have successful runs of a few weeks, and then I’d end up not meditating one day. And that perceived failure…

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Photo from a photobooth, from 1961, showing a young woman with glasses holding a baby. She's smiling, while he's looking startled and overawed by the experience.

Reflections on the death of my mother

By Bodhipaksa

It’s my birthday today, and it’s unlike any I can remember from my now 63 years on this planet. It’s the first birthday I’ve had since my mother* passed away on Christmas Eve, just 11 days ago. My younger sister died just over a year ago, and I wrote then about how my practice helped…

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Illustration of a New Year's resolution list, with one item on it: "Quit making New Year's resolutions."

Made a New Year’s resolution to meditate daily? Here’s how to make it happen

By Bodhipaksa

It’s early January, and many people who made New Year’s resolutions are already going “Oops!” as they realize they’ve already missed a morning at the gym, binged on something unhealthy, or forgotten to meditate. It’s very hard to change habits. The habit I’m most interested in is daily meditation, which is something I nailed a…

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Try Out the Bodhi Mind Meditation App

The Bodhi Mind meditation app—for iPhone and iPad—gives you access to more than 200 guided meditations, recorded by Bodhipaksa, the founder of Wildmind.

The Bodhi Mind app available for download on the app store.

You’ll find all the guided meditations from Bodhipaksa's CDs and meditation courses, plus materials that he's recorded for other purposes. Some live recordings from retreats and workshops have been added, with more on the way!

The app is free to download.

All of the meditations are available for a two week trial. After that you’ll have access to a selection of tracks, and you can unlock the rest by signing up for a subscription.

 

Recommended Posts From Wildmind's Blog

Benjamin Disraeli

“To believe in the heroic makes heroes” Benjamin Disraeli

By Bodhipaksa

In the Path of Freedom, a 1st century meditation manual that I’ve mentioned a few times because it’s the earliest source I know of for cultivating lovingkindness and compassions in stages, we’re asked first of all to connect with mudita (appreciation) in the following way: When one sees or hears that some person’s qualities are…

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Milarepa sitting, with a hand raised to his right ear, listening.

Meditating with tinnitus

By Mandy Sutter

If you suffer from tinnitus – persistent ringing in the ears – you may wonder whether meditation is a good idea. And yet it can be a powerful tool in helping you come to terms with the white noise inside your head. Meditator and long-time tinnitus sufferer Mandy Sutter airs some of the issues. Tinnitus…

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G.K. Chesterton

G.K. Chesterton: “The true object of all human life is play.”

By Bodhipaksa

The bodhisattva moves through life elegantly, “in the zone” and in a state of playful “flow,” and he can do this because he has abandoned any clinging to the idea of self. “Let go of your sense of self; you have nothing to lose but your suffering,” Bodhipaksa tells us. I think Chesterton was absolutely…

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Two children sitting side by side, the older one with a protective arm around the younger.

From shame to self-worth: the spectrum of shame

By Rick Hanson PhD

Shame is a very primal emotion, one that has a lot of traction in the mind. As we grow up, from infants to adults, shame elaborates many nuances, like the branches and twigs growing from a single trunk. Let’s consider four common sources of shame spectrum feelings. 1. Needs Not Being Acknowledged First, consider a…

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Practice when life gets tough

By Sunada Takagi

Sometimes life comes at us full force and overwhelms us. That’s what happened to me the last few months. Things happened that were so overpowering that all my usual routines went out the window just so I could get through each day. My work, my social life – and yes, my sitting practice – pretty…

Read More
Photo by Debby Hudson on Unsplash

Seven tips for people who struggle with lovingkindness practice

By Bodhipaksa

In the tradition I practice in, lovingkindness (metta bhavana) and mindfulness meditation are considered equally important, and yet my own informal surveys suggest that about a third of long-term practitioners have essentially given up on lovingkindness practice, doing it hardly at all, or skipping it altogether. Often people have problems with the first stage, which…

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Charles Darwin

Four reasons Buddhists can love evolution

By Bodhipaksa

Evolution — at least in the United States — has a deeply troubled relationship with religion. Or at least it does with some religions. As you can see from the Pew Trust chart below, Buddhists on the whole (81% of them) think that evolution is the best explanation for the origins of human life on…

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Depiction of the Buddha in a carved stone frieze

Debunking seven myths about the Buddha

By Bodhipaksa

Some of the misconceptions about the Buddha are so common that you’ll find them in just about every book on Buddhism. The problem is that most of these books are merely rehashes of other books on Buddhism, so that misconceptions get passed on for decades and even centuries. So here I’d like to debunk some…

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The sacred pause

By Tara Brach

In our lives we often find ourselves in situations we can’t control, circumstances in which none of our strategies work. Helpless and distraught, we frantically try to manage what is happening. Our child takes a downward turn in academics and we issue one threat after another to get him in line. Someone says something hurtful…

Read More

About Buddhist meditation

buddha statueIn a way there's nothing very "Buddhist" about the meditation you'll find on Wildmind. When you pay attention to your breath, or to the sensations in your body as you walk, or when you cultivate feelings of love for another person, you won't have a sense that you're doing anything very "religious." In a way these are simply "human" meditation practices -- ways that a human being can pay attention to his or her own experience, and gently cultivate greater awareness and love.

The simplest form of meditation we teach here is mindfulness of breathing. The essence of this practice is that we simply bring our attention to the sensations of the breathing, and when the mind wanders, as it will, we gently steer it back to the breath once again. However in the form we teach here, there are four stages, each of which has a specific purpose in helping us to develop calmness, energy, continuity of awareness, or one-pointedness.

The other main form of meditation that we teach is the cultivation of lovingkindness, in which we take responsibility for our emotions, and encourage the development of qualities of empathy, patience, kindness, and compassion.

We also teach you how to set up your meditation posture (an essential consideration in any form of meditation practice), as well as walking meditation.

And outside of these structured guides to meditation, we have a blog with a vast collection of news stories about meditation, articles on practice, and reviews of books, CDS, and videos.

About Buddhist meditation

buddha statueIn a way there's nothing very "Buddhist" about the meditation you'll find on Wildmind. When you pay attention to your breath, or to the sensations in your body as you walk, or when you cultivate feelings of love for another person, you won't have a sense that you're doing anything very "religious." In a way these are simply "human" meditation practices -- ways that a human being can pay attention to his or her own experience, and gently cultivate greater awareness and love.

The simplest form of meditation we teach here is mindfulness of breathing. The essence of this practice is that we simply bring our attention to the sensations of the breathing, and when the mind wanders, as it will, we gently steer it back to the breath once again. However in the form we teach here, there are four stages, each of which has a specific purpose in helping us to develop calmness, energy, continuity of awareness, or one-pointedness.

The other main form of meditation that we teach is the cultivation of lovingkindness, in which we take responsibility for our emotions, and encourage the development of qualities of empathy, patience, kindness, and compassion.

We also teach you how to set up your meditation posture (an essential consideration in any form of meditation practice), as well as walking meditation.

And outside of these structured guides to meditation, we have a blog with a vast collection of news stories about meditation, articles on practice, and reviews of books, CDS, and videos.

About the meditation practices you can learn on this site

Our Posture Workshop

Our posture workshop is where we suggest you start if you don't already have a meditation practice (and perhaps even if you do). We'll take you step-by-step through the process of setting up a meditation posture that will allow you to be both alert and relaxed.

The mindfulness of breathing

The mindfulness of breathing is a fundamental meditation practice that everyone should know. The benefits? You'll find that this practice helps you to calm your mind so that there's less inner chatter (especially the stuff that makes you unhappy). You'll find also that you're less distractible and better able to pay attention.

The development of lovingkindness

The development of lovingkindness (metta bhavana) works directly on our emotional habits, helping us to become more emotionally positive. You'll learn to be kinder to yourself: more patient, more understanding. You'll find that you're more considerate to others and that it's easier to forgive. You may even find (as others have) that others around you mysteriously become easier to be around. Hmmm.. wonder why that is?

Walking meditation

Walking meditation is a great way to bring more meditation into your daily life; it's a practice that can be done even in a busy city street. In this form of practice we develop greater mindfulness of the body, but we also become more aware of our thought patterns, our emotions, and even of the outside world. It's a calming practice. Walking meditation can also be a lovingkindness practice, especially when you're walking in a public place.

Mantra meditation

Our mantra meditation section is the most popular destination for our visitors. Mantras are simply phrases that we repeat (usually internally, but they can also be chanted out loud). As well as occupying the mind and thus calming it by preventing it from getting up to the usual mischief that causes us pain, mantras also have a symbolic value that evokes spiritual qualities.

The six element practice

The six element practice is a profound reflection on interconnectedness and impermanence. It's a very beautiful form of meditation. It not only helps us to calm the mind and give us a reassuring sense of our place in the great scheme of things, but it can be unsettling and challenging as well. Yes, I know. Reassuring and unsettling. That's Buddhist practice for you!  

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