Comments on: Meditation and stress https://www.wildmind.org Explore Meditation Online Fri, 15 Dec 2017 01:05:32 +0000 hourly 1 By: Trivedi Effect https://www.wildmind.org/applied/stress/comment-page-1#comment-771812 Thu, 26 Feb 2015 14:15:30 +0000 https://test.wildmind.org/meditation-and-stress/#comment-771812 Meditate while commuting to work on a bus or train, or waiting for a dentist appointment. Try deep breathing while you are doing housework or mowing the lawn. Mindfulness walking can be done while exercising your dog, walking to your car, or climbing the stairs at work instead of using the elevator.

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By: Bodhipaksa https://www.wildmind.org/applied/stress/comment-page-1#comment-769490 Thu, 15 Jan 2015 14:52:54 +0000 https://test.wildmind.org/meditation-and-stress/#comment-769490 It’s quite common, Markus.

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By: Markus https://www.wildmind.org/applied/stress/comment-page-1#comment-769394 Wed, 14 Jan 2015 21:36:47 +0000 https://test.wildmind.org/meditation-and-stress/#comment-769394 Hello Bodhipaksa, while I was meditating last night I saw purple and indigo colors on my meditation, I usually see bright white light that vanishes, but this time the colors of purple and indigo keep on coming to my meditation while I was having thoughts of being on a different frequency. I don’t know if this makes much sense to you, but I am curious if something like this has happened to you or if you are aware of any of this?

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By: Don Carter, MSW, LCSW https://www.wildmind.org/applied/stress/comment-page-1#comment-765854 Mon, 15 Dec 2014 06:50:08 +0000 https://test.wildmind.org/meditation-and-stress/#comment-765854 Thanks for this website and the efforts to manage stress! Working as a counselor I see chronic stress cases every day in my practice. There are so many stress-related disorders these days it’s like an epidemic. Major life changes in our outer environment are said to be the most powerful stressors and I agree to a certain extent (loss of a marriage or loved one is very stressful!)

But the inner environment of self-talk and emotional “triggers” are just as powerful for some, including those who have lots of unfinished business re: childhood.

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By: Bodhipaksa https://www.wildmind.org/applied/stress/comment-page-1#comment-742550 Thu, 25 Sep 2014 03:20:09 +0000 https://test.wildmind.org/meditation-and-stress/#comment-742550 I’m glad you got the response. Sorry if I sounded snippy!

It’s wise to consider that although these anxious responses may be maladaptive and unhelpful, there are reasons for them taking place, even if we’re not sure what those reasons are. And it’s certainly not that you’ve decided to have them, so there’s really no need for shame.

Have you tried putting the advice I gave into practice? I find that self-compassion is a very powerful practice.

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By: Antonio https://www.wildmind.org/applied/stress/comment-page-1#comment-741972 Wed, 24 Sep 2014 21:16:42 +0000 https://test.wildmind.org/meditation-and-stress/#comment-741972 It’s nothing personal, I don’t give out my email unless absolutely necessary. Thank you very much for your thoughtful response, Bodhipaksa. The startle response has always been there to some degree, but I think it has become a negative habit/obsession in adulthood. I know that everyone’s experience is unique, but I am overcome with feelings of isolation and guilt when these anxious feelings arise because of how absurd they seem.

Thanks again,
A.R.

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By: Bodhipaksa https://www.wildmind.org/applied/stress/comment-page-1#comment-730132 Sat, 30 Aug 2014 18:13:43 +0000 https://test.wildmind.org/meditation-and-stress/#comment-730132 Hi, Antonio.

Given that you’ve used an obviously fake email address, you’ll probably not receive any notification that I’ve replied, and so I’m probably wasting my time because you’ll never see this. What’s that about anyway? “I trust you to help me with my meditation practice, but I think you might be a spammer”?

Anyway, on the off-chance that you do see this, I’m sorry to hear that you experience such anxiety over noises. I’d be curious to know if this is something you’ve always experienced, or whether it’s something that’s grown over time. Some people have a strong startle response from childhood, and I suspect that although that can be toned down, it’s a more entrenched habit than a startle response that’s been learned in adulthood.

Generally, though, yes: do try noticing your anxiety as you anticipate the bell. See if you can notice the first signs of discomfort, notice as best you can where they are in the body, and send that part of yourself love and reassurance. You can say things like: May you be well and happy. Or: Let me feel this. It’s OK to feel this. Or: It’s OK. We’ve been through this before. We can handle this.

Any emotional reassurance is likely to be helpful, and using your thinking in this way will make it less likely that your mind will be hijacked by thoughts that create worry.

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By: Antonio https://www.wildmind.org/applied/stress/comment-page-1#comment-721279 Wed, 30 Jul 2014 08:11:07 +0000 https://test.wildmind.org/meditation-and-stress/#comment-721279 Hello, Bodhipaka
I have a bit of an unusual problem regarding anxiety that has proven to be a challenge in my meditation. I am fairly easily startled and very self-conscious about it, so many guided meditations that use a not-so-gentle noise to signify the end, that that’s what my mind locks into. My chest tightens, heart rate rises as I anticipate the noise. I know that I should sit with this feeling and examine it, but so many times the anxiety pulls me down under the current with a flood of negative thoughts that I’m not able to be mindful of it like I should. This isn’t something that just comes up in meditation. During the day, the fear or anticipation of a loud, sudden noise can sometimes take me out of the moment I’m in. Should I meditate on the anticipation of such things? Sometimes I fear that doing so would fuel the fire that is already burning. I wish I didn’t have this pride that makes me so afraid of showing weakness around others.

Best wishes,
A.R.

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By: Bodhipaksa https://www.wildmind.org/applied/stress/comment-page-1#comment-719367 Sat, 19 Jul 2014 15:13:33 +0000 https://test.wildmind.org/meditation-and-stress/#comment-719367 Have you tried using the search function on this site, Ray? We’ve covered at least ten news stories about the use of meditation to help with the symptoms of PTSD, and those might give you some encouragement, and possibly some leads to resources.

I’m hesitant to give advice, because PTSD isn’t something I’m familiar with. In general, though, meditation offers us an opportunity to reassure the more emotionally reactive parts of the brain. Lovingkindness practice can, in particular, be a powerful way of taking care of the parts of us that are suffering. More specifically, though, I’d suggest the practice of self-compassion. I recently participated in a webinar on that topic, and you might find that useful.

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By: Ray https://www.wildmind.org/applied/stress/comment-page-1#comment-719034 Thu, 17 Jul 2014 16:42:43 +0000 https://test.wildmind.org/meditation-and-stress/#comment-719034 I havew been strugling with PTSD. Most of the current thoughs on PTSD do not connect meditation with symptom relief for PTSD. I have been trying to meditate, but seem to get caught in thoughts. Any advice would be helpful.
T

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