depression

Meditation training may help reduce stress disorders among US military personnel

wildmind meditation newsMedical Xpress: Researchers from the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Naval Health Research Center have found that mindfulness training – a combination of meditation and body awareness exercises – can help U.S. Marine Corps personnel prepare for and recover from stressful combat situations.

The study, published in the May 16, 2014 online issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry, suggests that incorporating meditative practices into pre-deployment training might be a way to help the U.S. military reduce rising rates of stress-related health conditions, including PTSD, depression and anxiety, within its ranks.

“Mindfulness training won’t make combat easier,” said Martin Paulus, MD, …

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Japanese study shows positive effects of meditation, helps with depression and anxiety

wildmind meditation newsJohn Hofilena, Japan Daily Press: Hiroaki Kumano, professor at Japan’s Waseda University, has recently publicized his study on how meditation affects blood flow to the brain and, over the long-term, improve brain function. The assumption is that changes in the brain can lead to changes in the body as well. It has been somewhat proven that positive changes in the brain can cause improvement with illnesses, including the use of psychotherapeutic drugs to help improve a patient’s mood or reduce unhealthy behavior.

Professor Kumano is exploring the effects of a type of meditation called “mindfulness” – a cognitive therapy technique used to treat …

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Try meditation for anxiety relief

wildmind meditation newsDr. Eddy Lang and Dr. Zoe Oliver, Edmonton Journal: This viable alternative approach has little downside, study shows.

Glenda is a 52-year-old woman who has recently experienced a divorce. She has not slept or eaten properly for months. In turn, her work and relationships have been affected. Her thoughts were scattered and her irritability was raising eyebrows among her co-workers.

Generally averse to taking medicines, Glenda asked her doctor if there was something “that didn’t involve a poke or a pill” that could help her better cope with her developing anxiety problem. While advertisements might have you believe that antidepressant or antianxiety drugs …

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Meditation benefits sufferers of anxiety and depression

wildmind meditation newsMatthew Warburton, Guardian Liberty Voice: Meditation was once seen in the West as something for robed monks and mountain hermits. Recent scientific evidence has redefined the concept as a tool that can be integrated into a busy modern life. Regular practice of meditation has been shown to have benefits for sufferers of anxiety, depression, and stress, and can improve mental functioning and well-being.

The art of meditation is ancient and data suggests it was used by prehistoric civilizations. Objects found in India which date back to 3,000 B.C show evidence of its practice, and the first written scriptures can be found in Hindu Vedantism …

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Mindfulness-based meditation helps teenagers with cancer

Mindfulness-based meditation could lessen some symptoms associated with cancer in teens, according to the results of a clinical trial intervention led by researchers at the University of Montreal and its affiliated CHU Sainte-Justine children’s hospital.

Mindfulness-based meditation focuses on the present moment and the connection between the mind and body. Adolescents living with cancer face not only the physical symptoms of their condition, but also the anxiety and uncertainty related to the progression of the disease, the anticipation of physical and emotional pain related to illness and treatment, the significant changes implied in living with cancer, as well as the fear of recurrence after remission. Catherine Malboeuf-Hurtubise of the university’s Department of Psychology presented the findings today at the American Psychosomatic Society Meeting in San Francisco.

The researchers asked 13 adolescents with cancer to complete questionnaires covering mood (positive and negative emotions, anxiety and depression), sleep and quality of life. The group was divided in two: a first group of eight adolescents were offered eight mindfulness-based meditation sessions and the remaining five adolescents in the control group were put on a wait-list. The eight sessions were 90 minutes long and took place weekly. After the last meditation session, patients from both groups filled out the same questionnaires a second time. “We analyzed differences in mood, sleep and quality of life scores for each participant and then between each group to evaluate if mindfulness sessions had a greater impact than the simple passage of time. We found that teenagers that participated in the mindfulness group had lower scores in depression after our 8 sessions. Girls from the mindfulness group reported sleeping better. We also noticed that they developed mindfulness skills to a greater extent than boys during the sessions,” Malboeuf-Hurtubise said. “Our results suggest that mindfulness sessions could be helpful in improving mood and sleep in teenagers with cancer, as previous oncology research suggests with adults.”

Differences between both groups were not large enough for the researchers to impute observed benefits solely to the mindfulness component of the sessions. “The social support provided to the adolescents in the mindfulness group could possibly explain observed benefits on mood and sleep,” Malboeuf-Hurtubise said. “Nonetheless, mindfulness-based interventions for teenagers with cancer appear as a promising option to lighten psychological inconveniences of living with cancer.” The researchers intend to offer members of the control group an opportunity to undertake the meditation sessions.

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Meditation: A stress reliever, but not a panacea

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Melissa Healy, Los Angles Times: Take a deep breath, meditation enthusiasts: A new study finds that research on mindfulness meditation has yielded moderate evidence that the practice can reduce anxiety, depressive symptoms and pain, but little to no evidence that it can reduce substance abuse or improve mood, sleep or weight control. And no evidence was found that meditation programs were better than drugs, exercise or other behavioral therapies at addressing issues of mental health.
The latest word on meditation’s effects comes from a meta-analysis–essentially a study of existing clinical trials that sifts, consolidates and distills their findings. It’s published in JAMA Internal …

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Meditation as medicine?

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Business2Community.com: For centuries, people have meditated to gain deeper insight and wisdom about themselves and their lives. More recently, researchers have studied meditation to gain insight about its effect on psychological wellbeing. Can it help ease pain, depression, or anxiety? Does it relieve stress, improve mood and concentration, or short-circuit substance abuse? What is its effect on sleep and weight?

To find out exactly what meditation can and cannot do, Madhav Goya, M.D., M.P.H, assistant professor of medicine in the division of general internal medicine at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, conducted a review of the study literature to date. Dr. Goyal …

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Should we be mindful of mindfulness?

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David Derbyshire,
The Observer: It has been prescribed by the NHS for depression since 2004 but recently mindfulness has spawned a whole industry of evening classes and smartphone apps. What is the evidence that the practice – part meditation, part CBT – works?

At just after 6.15pm in a brightly lit conference room in Oxford, 22 grown men and women are lying on the floor trying hard to focus on their left knee. From across the room a lilting, calm voice has already invited the group to explore their feet and ankles with “gentle curiosity” and is heading up through the body. “When your mind …

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Mindful meditation is being used to help with a range of problems

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Sarah Matheson, Oxford Mail: Mindfulness meditation has gone viral.

With its adoption by the medical establishment, it is now considered one of the most effective treatments for a whole range of conditions from depression, anxiety and addiction to eating disorders and chronic pain.

Its success is widely documented with intriguing evidence of very particular patterns shown in the brain scans of meditators. But where did this practice originate?

Taught by the Buddha 2,600 years ago, the tradition has been kept alive in Buddhist monasteries throughout Asia. It has now spread amongst lay people throughout the world as its benefits have become increasingly widely recognised.

Mindfulness meditation is a technique for observing the mind in the present moment so that we can wake up to its true nature – this can often be a shocking revelation.

As we practise, we begin to see how we hurtle from one moment to the next in the pursuit of feeling better or seeking a refuge from pain.

We can also see how this …

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The benefits of meditation

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Ellie Donahue-Miller, The Brock Press: Meditation is not a new concept. Mindfulness and meditation have been used by some cultures for centuries. The incorporation of these practices into Western culture, though, is relatively new and it offers promising benefits.

Although there are few conclusive studies that document the health benefits of meditation, many therapists and psychologists recognize that it plays an important role in maintaining mental health. It is particularly helpful for treating anxiety and depression.

“The evidence suggests that mindfulness meditation programs could help reduce anxiety, depression and pain in some clinical populations,” said a report published on Jan. 6 by the Journal of American Medical Association.

“Thus, clinicians should be prepared to talk with their patients about the role that a meditation program could have in addressing psychological stress.”

The report’s lead author, Madhav Goyal, an assistant professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine said, “A lot of people have this idea that meditation means sitting down and doing nothing. But that’s not true. Meditation is an active training of the mind to increase awareness, and different meditation programs approach this in different ways.”

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